7-2 Final Project Submission Epidemiological Research Study Report.docx

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Running head: EPIDEMIOLOGICAL RESEARCH STUDY REPORT 1 Epidemiological Research Study Report Salmonella in the Caribbean Final Project Damarys Ramos Sothern New Hampshire University
EPIDEMIOLOGICAL RESEARCH STUDY REPORT 2 Population In the final research of the Salmonella in the Caribbean, the statistical data was examined. It was presented both by CAREC and by the independent case-control study which included 45 patients and 92 controls. The setting of the research was Trinidad and Tobago in 1998-1999. When analyzing the sources of exposure of the Salmonella virus, represented in Table 2, it becomes evident that one of the primary ways of transmitting the disease is eating the uncooked foods such as raw eggs. That is, the behavioral factors play the significant role in the spreading of the disease among the citizens of Trinidad and Tobago. The assumption can also be confirmed when observing the workshops established for populations after the study was conducted. It is stated that “These strategies combined public health education of consumers, food service establishments, and food workers” (“Salmonella…”, 2017, p. 12). The social factors such as one’s behavior, mainly, the absence of the culture of conscious food consumption, can directly impact the spreading of the disease. The primary healthcare disparity associated with the outbreak of Salmonella was the inadequate surveillance system, which, predictably, did not match the demand of citizens for the timely diagnosing (thus, easier treatment) of Salmonella (“Salmonella…”, 2017, p. 3). The next problem was that the surveillance was based on the physician-report system of documenting the cases of Salmonella (“Salmonella…”, 2017, p. 4). This approach was lacking evidence and often did not take the laboratory-confirmed results into account. Finally, the third problem also lies in the field of surveillance: 40% of cases of Salmonella remained unreported by physicians (“Salmonella…”, 2017, p. 5), probably due to the extra paperwork they had to undergo. It is clear from the Figure 5 that small children are more predisposed to having the Salmonella virus. The above-stated disparities affect them the most, as, predictably, they are the
EPIDEMIOLOGICAL RESEARCH STUDY REPORT 3 most vulnerable population, and the lack of timely diagnosing can result in mortality among this category of citizens. The prevalence of some other ‘common’ diseases among infants such as flu, cold, etc., and the lack of the laboratory-confirmed surveillance system could have resulted in the various medical errors. Finally, infants are also directly impacted the most by the fact that 40% of all cases of Salmonella are unreported: they can be represented the most among these cases, as the physicians may underestimate the scopes of the problem and ignore the overall significance of the surveillance of Salmonella.

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