LASTpaper - Effects on Food Intake Running Head: EFFECTS ON...

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Effects on Food Intake Running Head: EFFECTS ON FOOD INTAKE Experimenter Effects on Food Intake in College Women University of Iowa 1
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Effects on Food Intake Abstract The present research examined the effects of experimenter attire on food consumption in female subjects at the University of Iowa. Previous research has shown that subjects consume less food in the presence of a member of the opposite sex. In other studies eating behaviors have shown to be inhibited by manipulating social desirability and other environmental cues. We believe that these inhibitions to eat may be more prevalent in those who are high self-monitors and will use the Self Monitoring Scale developed by Mark Snyder to determine this. We attempted to answer the question of whether or not experimenter attractiveness has an effect on food consumption. This was done by running subjects through an experiment where they believe they are answering questions about moral dilemmas, while we are actually concerned with food consumption and self- monitoring. This study had four conditions which had a male or female experimenter dressed professionally or unprofessionally in an attempt to manipulate attractiveness. The experiment involved 57 women who attend the University of Iowa and was run at two different locations on the university campus. Our results produced no statistically significant evidence but may suggest that neither experimenter gender nor their attire has an effect on food consumption in college-aged women. 2
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Effects on Food Intake Introduction The mere presence of others has multiple effects on one’s behavior. These effects could be a change in communication patterns or eating behaviors. In this study research was done to explore food intake behavior in the presence of others. Previous research has already explored certain aspects of this but none have looked into how attractiveness may play a role. This study investigated the effects of gender and experimenter attractiveness, through professional and unprofessional attire, on food consumption in young college women. This study could provide results that would set a foundation for further research on the eating behaviors of adults ages 18-24. Pliner and Chaiken (1989) conducted research that showed when in the presence of a person of the opposite sex, both males and females ate less than when in the presence of someone of the same sex. They determined, in a secondary study, that females might have eaten less in an attempt to be more socially desirable and feminine. This idea is supported by other research in which participants of both genders were able to eat snacks in a situation where they were meeting a same gender or opposite gender partner (a confederate) whose social desirability was manipulated (Mori, Chaiken, & Pliner, 1987). The study showed that women ate significantly less when in the presence of a desirable
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LASTpaper - Effects on Food Intake Running Head: EFFECTS ON...

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