Fast Plant Report.docx - FAST PLANTS Nathan Zachariah 1...

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FAST PLANTSNathan & Zachariah 1Report#2: Fast PlantsTania Nathan and Mereena ZachariahCity University of New York York CollegeBiology 202 Lab (DDF)Dr. Abiola Oladipo5/12/17
FAST PLANTSNathan & Zachariah 2Report#2: Fast PlantsObjective: The analysis of Genetic Crossing depends upon understanding Mendel’s Law ofSegregationand Independent Assortment,phenotypes (physical appearances) and genotypes(genetic appearances). This experiment was performed to understand Mendelian Genetics byexploring the P1(First Parental Generation/Maternal Parent), P2(Second ParentalGeneration/Paternal Parent), F1(First Filial Generation, and F2(Second Filial Generation) plants.To determine the phenotypes and genotypes was performed by, first planting the P1 and P2seeds, and then using the seeds that grew and fell off the F1 plants, planting those seeds as F2seeds a few weeks after. The F2 plants were observed to see if the phenotypes were the same inthe F1 generation, (P1 and P2 plants); the F2 plants were also compared with Mendel’s Law ofIndependent Assortment. Introduction:Gregor Johann Mendel, a monk and scientist, founded the modern science of genetics bygathering evidence to explain how genetics worked. Mendel had two laws of genetics, the Lawof Segregation and the Law of Independence. In the Law of Segregation, it states, “paired allelesseparate during the formation of gametes,” (Investigating Mendelian Genetics with WisconsinFast Plants); a pair of characteristic traits can be represented in one gamete. In the Law ofIndependent Assortment, it states, “each allele segregates independently of the other allele ingamete formation,” (Investigating Mendelian Genetics with Wisconsin Independent Assortment).These two laws reflect the process of meiosis, because they are found the cell nucleus; they aremade up of several chromosomes carrying the genetic traits. In the process of meiosis, a
FAST PLANTSNathan & Zachariah 3reproductive cell is created and usually contains one chromatid for each chromosome. By thetwo cells merging, the genes are mixed and the resulting cell becomes a new embryo. The termsthat will be used to discuss the characteristics observed in the plants are dominant and recessive.For example, if the F1 generation of pea plants were dominant, the phenotypes would be purplestem and green leaves. Therefore, the F2 generation would probably have green stems andyellow leaves, contributing to a recessive trait.

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