Lenses Lab Report - Matt Rodden Emaijah Johnson Dr Longo Lenses Abstract Lenses can be utilized along with a screen and light source in order to

Lenses Lab Report - Matt Rodden Emaijah Johnson Dr...

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Matt Rodden, Emaijah Johnson Dr. Longo3/4/18LensesAbstractLenses can be utilized along with a screen and light source in order to analyze the bending of light rays, otherwise known as refraction. The thin lens equation, 1/p + 1/q = 1/f can be used to analyze the simple rules that light rays follow when they pass through a thin lens. The variables p, q, y0, yi, and f can be determined and a relationship can be found for a variety of lenses with varying magnifications. We can manipulate the position of the lens to test its relation to the focal length as well as reassuring that variables pand qobey the equation. The relationship between object distance, image distance, and focal length can then be studied with respects to the thin lens equation to analyze the relationship between lenses with various magnifications. IntroductionRefraction refers to the phenomenon that happens when the direction of a light wave changes while passing from one medium to another due to a change in the speed of the ray. This procedure studies refraction with two surfaces: air-to-medium and medium-to-air; if the surfaces are spherical and close in proximity, one is known as a thin lens. The results of this bending of light (refraction) can be placed into the thin lens equation, which reads: 1/p + 1/q = 1/f. In other words, this formula equates to: 1/object distance + 1/image distance = 1/focal length. The focal point refers to the location where parallel rays of light meet, or converge. In addition to the focal point, the focal length, which was mentioned in the thin lens equation, is the distance between the center of a convex lens and the focal point of that lens. Therefore, the focal point of the lenses used in this procedure is found by allowing a bundle of parallel rays to enter the lens from the light source. The lens can then alter the direction of these light waves, which makes them emerge as a convergent or divergent bundle of rays. It’s critical to focus on the point at which they converge, which we know as the focal point.

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