LO2.docx - 1 Part I Following the genesis of the space race...

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1 Part I Following the genesis of the space race in the 1960s, The United States’ space program has held a unique significance for Americans. By the mid-1980s, America’s cutting-edge space shuttle program was a gem in the crown of American progress(Jack). However, the space program’s illustrious status was staggered on January 28, 1986. That day, the space shuttle Challenger with seven people aboard, one of them Christa McAuliffe, a social studies teacher from New Hampshire, exploded 73 seconds into liftoff (King et al. 1). Reagan as a consoler, national father, and an American was very effective in meeting the emotional needs of four audiences including the USA, families of the fallen astronauts, school children and NASA. He uses ethos to communicate shock and grieve to the Americans while comforting the American people and convincing them the importance of the program. President Ronald Reagan's emotional connection throughout his speech rubbed the American people and united them to grieve the painful national loss. In his opening statement, Reagan says “Nancy, and I are pained to the core by the tragedy of the shuttle Challenger. We know we share this pain with all of the people our country. This is truly a national loss.” Reagan addresses not only the families of the deceased astronauts but also the children, “every man and woman who work for NASA” and the entire nation. The use of the pronouns “I,” “us,” and “we” demonstrates that Reagan had invested in the statement personally and naming of his wife in the speech built an elegiac tone. Furthermore, He steps out of his presidential role and makes it clear

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