Coursepack COM 436 Sp18 Ceccarelli.pdf

Coursepack COM 436 Sp18 Ceccarelli.pdf - 1 COM 436 Sp18...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 COM 436 Sp18: CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN PUBLIC ADDRESS TABLE OF CONTENTS Read for Mon. Mar. 26 Course Syllabus ………………………………………………………………………………. 4 Course Schedule………………………………………………………………………………. 6 Paper Writing Guide………………………………………………………………………….. 8 Notetaking Guide………………………………………………………………………………. 10 Read for Wed. Mar. 28 Context Preview for Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Declaration of War………………………...12 Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Declaration of War, 8 December 1941…………………………..16 Context Preview for James Omura & Fair Play Committee texts……………………………. 18 James Omura, “Let Us Not Be Rash,” 28 February 1944……………………………………. 22 Fair Play Committee, Bulletin #3, 1 March 1944……………………………………………. 24 Read for Mon. Apr. 2 Context Preview for Harry S. Truman, Far Eastern Policy Speech……………………………26 Harry S. Truman, Far Eastern Policy Speech, 11 April 1951 …………………………………29 Context Preview for Douglas MacArthur, “Old Soldiers Never Die”…………………………35 Douglas MacArthur, “Old Soldiers Never Die,” 19 April 1951 ………………………………38 Read for Wed. Apr. 4 Context Preview for Dwight D. Eisenhower, “Atoms for Peace”…………………………….. 45 Dwight D. Eisenhower, “Atoms for Peace,” 8 December 1953 ……………………………… 46 Context Preview for Dwight D. Eisenhower, Farewell Address……………………………… 53 Dwight D. Eisenhower, Farewell Address, 17 January 1961…………………………………. 55 Read for Mon. Apr. 9 Context Preview for John F. Kennedy, Inaugural Address…………………………………… 59 John F. Kennedy, Inaugural Address, 20 January 1961………………………………………. 60 Context Preview for John F. Kennedy, Cuban Missile Crisis Address………………………...63 John F. Kennedy, Cuban Missile Crisis Address, 22 October 1962 …………………………...65 Read for Wed. Apr. 11 Context Preview for Richard Nixon, “The Great Silent Majority” …………………………… 70 Richard Nixon, “The Great Silent Majority,” 3 November 1969……………………………… 72 Context Preview for John Kerry, Vietnam Veterans against the War Statement……………… 82 John Kerry, Vietnam Veterans against the War Statement, 22 April 1971……………………. 83 Read for Mon. Apr. 16 Context Preview for Spiro Agnew, Television News Coverage………………………………. 89 Spiro Agnew, Television News Coverage, 13 November 1969 ………………………………..91 Context Preview for Martin Luther King Jr., Letter from Birmingham Jail…………………….98 Martin Luther King Jr., Letter from Birmingham Jail, 16 April 1963…………………………100 2 Read for Wed. Apr. 18 Context Preview for UW Faculty & Raymond Allen texts...………………………………... 113 UW Faculty, An Open Letter to President Allen, 7 April 1949……………………………....115 Raymond Allen, “Communists Should Not Teach in American Colleges,” May 1949…..…..116 Read for Mon. Apr. 23 Context Preview for Colin Powell, Speech to the UN Security Council……………………….124 Colin Powell, Speech to the UN Security Council, 5 February 2003…………………………..126 Read for Mon. Apr. 30 Context Preview for Richard Nixon, “Checkers”………………………………………………152 Richard Nixon, “Checkers,” 23 September 1952………………………………………………154 Context Preview for JFK’s Address to the Greater Houston Ministerial Association……...…163 JFK, Address to the Greater Houston Ministerial Association, 12 September 1960…………..165 Read for Wed. May 2 Context Preview for Mitt Romney, “Faith in America”……………………………………….169 Mitt Romney, “Faith in America,” 6 December 2007 ………………………………………...170 Context Preview for Barack Obama, “A More Perfect Union”………………………………. 175 Barack Obama, “A More Perfect Union,” 18 March 2008 …………………………………… 177 Read for Mon. May 7 Context Preview for Ronald Reagan, “A Time For Choosing,”.……………………....………187 Ronald Reagan, “A Time For Choosing,” 27 October 1964..……………………….………189 Context Preview for Mario Cuomo, DNC Keynote Address “A Tale of Two Cities,” ……… 198 Mario Cuomo, DNC Keynote Address “A Tale of Two Cities,” 16 July 1984 ………..…….. 200 Read for Wed. May 9 Context Preview for Hillary Clinton, “Basket of Deplorables”………………………………..209 Hillary Clinton, “Basket of Deplorables,” 9 September 2016 ……………………………..…212 Context Preview for Donald Trump, Speech to National Guard Association, Baltimore….... 215 Donald Trump, Speech to National Guard Association, Baltimore, Sept. 12, 2016…………..217 Read for Mon. May 14 Context Preview for Martin Luther King Jr., “I Have a Dream”……………………………...221 Martin Luther King Jr., “I Have a Dream,” 28 August 1963……………………………...…..222 Context Preview for Malcolm X, “The Ballot or the Bullet” ………………………………...226 Malcolm X, “The Ballot or the Bullet,” 12 April 1964………………………………………. 228 Read for Wed. May 16 Context Preview for Lyndon B. Johnson, “We Shall Overcome” ……………………………241 Lyndon B. Johnson, “We Shall Overcome,” 15 March 1965………………………………… 243 Context Preview for Robert F. Kennedy, On the Assassination of MLK Jr…………………. 251 Robert F. Kennedy, On the Assassination of MLK Jr., 4 April 1968………………………… 253 3 Read for Mon. May 21 Context Preview for Indians of All Nations, The Alcatraz Proclamation……………………. 255 Indians of All Nations, The Alcatraz Proclamation, 1969 …………………………………….257 Context Preview for Russell Means, “For America to Live, Europe Must Die!”……………. 260 Russell Means, “For America to Live, Europe Must Die!,” July 1980 ……………………… 262 Read for Wed. May 23 Context Preview for Shirley Chisholm, For the Equal Rights Amendment……………………271 Shirley Chisholm, For the Equal Rights Amendment, 10 August 1970 ………………………273 Context Preview for Eleanor Smeal, “The Feminization of Power”………………………….. 277 Eleanor Smeal, “The Feminization of Power,” 8 July 1987 ………………………………… 278 4 COMMUNICATION 436 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN PUBLIC ADDRESS SPRING 2018 Professor: Leah Ceccarelli Class Meetings: MW 10:30a–12:20p, SMI 205 Office Hours: MW 12:30–1:30p, & by appointment, CMU 145 E-mail: [email protected] TA: Anna Swan Office Hours: W 2:30–4:30p, & by appointment, CMU 340-M E-mail: [email protected] Course Description: Students in this course will learn how American public address has been designed to influence belief and action. We will apply rhetorical criticism to the study of American public speeches, essays, and declarations, engaging close readings of public texts in their context in order to better understand those texts, their rhetorical construction, and the culture from which they arose. This quarter covers American public address from WWII to the present. Student Learning Goals: 1. Engage in a close rhetorical reading of contemporary American public address. 2. Recognize and describe a rhetorical puzzle relating to a text, and then develop a new interpretation of that text in its context to resolve that puzzle. 3. Identify, define and use rhetorical concepts in the analysis of a text. 4. Identify similarities and differences in rhetorical strategy between texts. Required Texts: Texts linked to Communication 436 Canvas site at . Final Grade Determination: Midterm Examination …………………………………….…………………. 20% Final Examination …………………………………………………………… 20% Reading Quizzes ....………………………………………………………….. 20% Puzzle Section of Rhetorical Criticism Paper (3-4 pgs.)…………………….. 10% Final Criticism Paper (6-8 pgs.).…………………………………………….. 30% The grades you receive on assignments in this class will be determined according to a four point scale and then multiplied by the percentage that each assignment is worth to determine your final class grade. Reading Quizzes: Because it is impossible to follow a lecture or engage a meaningful discussion about the rhetorical construction of a text if you have not carefully read that text, it is very important that you attend class ready to participate in the learning process. To reward you for making this preparation a priority in your busy schedules, there will be a daily multiple-choice quiz that assesses how carefully you have read and thought about one of the assigned readings for that day. You will be allowed to use one 8½ x 11 inch sheet of notes per assigned text when taking these quizzes. (I will be testing your thoughtful reading of the texts, not your memory.) So when reading the assigned speeches, essays, or declarations, it would be wise to take notes. For suggestions about how to take effective notes in preparation for the quizzes, see the “Note Taking Guide,” available in the coursepack. I will give at least 12 reading quizzes over the course of the quarter. When determining your grade, I will only count your top 10 scores. In effect, this means that you can have at least two days in which you miss reading quizzes or do poorly on them without experiencing any negative impact on your grade. Midterm and Final Examinations: These exams will include identification and short essay questions. They will test your knowledge of the tools of rhetoric that are introduced and used in class and your understanding of the critical interpretations that we develop in class. Since they are designed to test knowledge and understanding, not memory, they will be open book/open notes exams. Rhetorical Criticism Paper: One of the main objectives of this course is to learn how to engage in the rhetorical criticism of contemporary American public address, and the best way to achieve that objective is to write a rhetorical criticism paper. Throughout the quarter, I will be modeling the practice of rhetorical criticism in class lectures. You will demonstrate your understanding of that practice by writing a 6-8 page rhetorical criticism paper on either Spiro Agnew’s “Television News Coverage” or Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail” (your choice; see class website for texts and 5 contextual information). It will be due in the 8th week of class, on May 14. Please see the “Paper Writing Guide” for more information about this assignment. To help you prepare to write the final draft, I have assigned a portion of the paper to be written in the 4th week of class April 16. For the earlier 3-4 page paper, you will complete only the first two organizational units of the final paper: the development of the puzzle (identifying it, providing evidence of its existence, and an argument that it’s truly puzzling), and the thesis statement (three sentences that summarize the puzzle, highlight its strangeness, and then preview the solution that you’ll go on to develop in the final paper). The final paper will revise this earlier paper and will also add the final two steps described on the “Paper Writing Guide.” Code of Conduct: Class meetings will include a mix of lecture and class discussion. During lectures, I will make the material as interesting and as clear as possible; you should be attentive to what is being said, and feel free to ask questions if anything is unclear. During class discussions, we will combine a spirit of cooperation with a commitment to critical thinking. The basic components of this ethic are listed below: • Everyone’s reading of the text is respected in this class. Although some interpretations might turn out to be incorrect (i.e., unsupported by evidence in the text or context), everyone’s ideas about the text are worthy of consideration. • Everyone should try to participate in the discussion. I will make it comfortable for everyone to join in, but I need your help! Those of you who find yourselves speaking more often should pause for a few minutes so that others can join in the conversation; those of you who find yourselves not contributing should make a special effort to add your voice to the conversation. • When you interpret, critique, or judge a public address artifact during a class discussion, you might be asked to provide the textual or contextual evidence to support your reading. This request should not be taken as an attack on you or your opinion. Likewise, if someone disagrees with your reading or provides counter-evidence, you should not take this as a personal reproach; instead, you should consider it a part of the collaborative learning process. • When a classmate interprets, critiques, or judges a public address artifact during a class discussion, everyone should be willing to help move the conversation forward by providing other evidence to support that reading or by providing counter-evidence that calls that reading into question. Discussion only works when we actively and critically engage each other’s ideas. Other Important Rules and Regulations: • There will be no makeup quizzes. If you have an illness or emergency that will cause you to miss more than two quizzes, contact me about it as soon as possible. If you have official university business that will take you out of town during class time (e.g., you are an athlete traveling for a game) you should speak to me before you leave. If given proper documentation, I can design alternative assignments on a case-by-case basis when emergency, extended illness, or official university business will result in missed quizzes. • If you have a disability that will affect your learning in this class, please speak to me at once so we can make arrangements to adapt the course to your special needs. 6 SCHEDULE How to read this schedule: The assignment refers to the material that should be prepared for that day. This may be a reading assignment or the midterm or final exam. There is likely to be a quiz on any day when there is a reading assignment. Assignment WEEK 1 Mon. Mar. 26 Orientation to the class Wed. Mar. 28 Rhetoric of War: World War II Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Declaration of War, 8 December 1941 James Omura, “Let Us Not Be Rash,” 28 February 1944 Fair Play Committee, Bulletin #3, 1 March 1944 Mon. Apr. 2 Rhetoric of War: Korea Harry S. Truman, Far Eastern Policy Speech, 11 April 1951 Douglas MacArthur, “Old Soldiers Never Die,” 19 April 1951 Wed. Apr. 4 Rhetoric of War: Cold War Dwight D. Eisenhower, “Atoms for Peace,” 8 December 1953 Dwight D. Eisenhower, Farewell Address, 17 January 1961 Mon. Apr. 9 Rhetoric of War: Cold War John F. Kennedy, Inaugural Address, 20 January 1961 John F. Kennedy, Cuban Missile Crisis Address, 22 October 1962 Wed. Apr. 11 Rhetoric of War: Vietnam Richard Nixon, “The Great Silent Majority,” 3 November 1969 John Kerry, Vietnam Veterans against the War Statement, 22 April 1971 Mon. Apr. 16 DUE: Puzzle Section of Rhetorical Criticism Paper Spiro Agnew, Television News Coverage, 13 November 1969 Martin Luther King Jr., Letter from a Birmingham Jail, 16 April 1963 Wed. Apr. 18 Rhetoric of War: Free Speech and Censorship UW Faculty, An Open Letter to President Allen, 7 April 1949 Raymond Allen, “Communists Should Not Teach in American Colleges,” May 1949 Mon. Apr. 23 Rhetoric of War: Iraq & Review for Midterm Colin Powell, Speech to the UN Security Council, 5 February 2003 Wed. Apr. 25 ***MIDTERM EXAMINATION*** WEEK 2 WEEK 3 WEEK 4 WEEK 5 WEEK 6 Mon. Apr. 30 Rhetoric of Political Campaigns Response to Crisis Richard Nixon, “Checkers,” 23 September 1952 John F. Kennedy, Address to the Greater Houston Ministerial Association, 12 September 1960 Wed. May 2 Rhetoric of Political Campaigns Response to Crisis Mitt Romney, “Faith in America,” 6 December 2007 Barack Obama, “A More Perfect Union,” 18 March 2008 7 WEEK 7 Mon. May 7 Rhetoric of Political Campaigns Speaking to the Party Faithful Ronald Reagan, “A Time For Choosing,” 27 October 1964 Mario Cuomo, DNC Keynote Address “A Tale of Two Cities,” 16 July 1984 Wed. May 9 Rhetoric of Political Campaigns 2016 Hillary Clinton, “Basket of Deplorables,” 9 September 2016 Donald Trump, Speech to National Guard Association, 12 September 2016 WEEK 8 Mon. May 14 Civil Rights Movement Martin Luther King Jr., “I Have a Dream,” 28 August 1963 Malcolm X, “The Ballot or the Bullet,” 12 April 1964 DUE: RHETORICAL CRITICISM PAPER Wed. May 16 Civil Rights Movement Lyndon B. Johnson, “We Shall Overcome,” 15 March 1965 Robert F. Kennedy, Remarks on the Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., 4 April 1968 Mon. May 21 American Indian Movement Indians of All Nations, The Alcatraz Proclamation, 1969 Russell Means, “For America to Live, Europe Must Die!,” July 1980 Wed. May 23 Feminist Movement Shirley Chisholm, For the Equal Rights Amendment, 10 August 1970 Eleanor Smeal, “The Feminization of Power,” 8 July 1987 WEEK 9 WEEK 10 Mon. May 28 MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY Wed. May 30 Review for Final Exam FINAL EXAM WEEK Mon. Jun. 4, 8:30-10:20a, SMI 205 ***FINAL EXAMINATION*** 8 COM 436: Contemporary American Public Address Paper Writing Guide Step by step process: First, before writing the paper, do your analysis and interpretation as follows: • • • • CONTEXT: Review information about the rhetorical situation faced by the speaker and if possible, the reception of the audience. TEXT: Do a close reading of the speech (or essay, or declaration, etc.), taking notes as you go along. PUZZLE: Identify a puzzle that you have discovered as a critical reader. This must be something that a critic who is seeking to understand the rhetorical strategy of the text will see as odd. It can be a contradiction found in the text itself, a disjunction between the text and its reception, a disjunction between the text and its professed or presumed purpose, etc. SOLUTION: Come up with some answers to that puzzle. These answers must be found through a close reading of the text. Your solution should be a new reading of the text that resolves the puzzle you identified. In your paper, the new reading you develop will help your readers see the text in a different way from how they saw it before. Then, write your paper. The organization of your paper should be as follows: 1. Begin by explaining the puzzle. (2-3 pages) a. Identify the puzzle. b. Provide evidence of it from the text, and if necessary, the context. c. Make a persuasive argument that this really is “puzzling” or “odd.” 2. Then provide your thesis statement. (3 sentences). a. The first sentence of your thesis should be a summary statement of the puzzle you just established. b. The second sentence of your thesis should be a rhetorical question that highlights what it is about the puzzle that is odd. c. The third sentence of your thesis should be a preview statement of the solution you are going to develop in the rest of the paper. 3. Then explain the reasonable solution to the puzzle that you discovered. (3-4 pages) a. Identify the solution. b. Provide evidence from the text to support your solution. Supporting evidence from your research into the context may be used as supplemental evidence. c. Make a persuasive argument that this clearly “resolves” the puzzle that you identified in the first half of your paper. 4. Conclude with a summary of what you’ve discovered about the text. This conclusion should encapsulate what you’ve contributed to our understanding of this text. (1-2 paragraphs) With this paper structure, your thesis statement comes in the middle of your paper, not at the beginning, and there is no preview of your argument in the first paragraph of your paper. A Note on Citations: Any material you use to support your claims in the paper (like quotes from the primary text, descriptions of what the author does in particular parts of the text, historical information about the context, evidence of how people responded to the text, or commentary about the text from another rhetorical critic) must be cited in your paper. For references to the primary text, cite the paragraph number of the passage you are referencing in parentheses at the end of the sentence in which you use it. For references to other materials, use Chicago style, with footnotes. See The Chicago Manual of Style, available at the reference desk in most libraries. A useful introduction to Chicago style is also available on-line at . Do not rely on citation management software or online citation tools to get your references right; errors will often appear in the citations, and should be fixed manually before you turn in the paper. 9 How I will grade this paper: To earn the top score, your paper must be written in a way that allows me to answer all of the following questions with a resounding YES: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Did the student say something significant, interesting, and relevant about the text? Did s/he identify a puzzle with...
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