day 3. compound sentences, adios.telescoping, brox and seltzer.pptm - Creating Compound Sentences Compound Sentences Remember compound sentences always

Day 3. compound sentences, adios.telescoping, brox and seltzer.pptm

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Creating Compound Sentences
Compound Sentences Remember, compound sentences always have TWO or more independent clauses combined with appropriate punctuation. Independent Clause + punctuation + Independent Clause There are FIVE different ways to do this: 1. Ind Clause + comma + coordinating conjunction + Ind Clause 2. Ind Clause + semi-colon+ Ind Clause 3. Ind Clause + dashes+ Ind Clause 4. Ind Clause + colon+ Ind Clause 5. Ind Clause + semi-colon+ conjunctive adverb+ comma +Ind Clause
Ind Clause + comma + coordinating conjunction + Ind Clause Coordinating Conjunctions = FANBOYS For And Nor But Or Yet SO Tim wrote his paper on time , so he received full credit. Ind Clause + comma + coordinating conjunction + Ind Clause
Ind Clause + semi-colon+ Ind Clause Combine two or more ideas that are closely related: Franklin Stubbs was a Rookie of the Year for the Dodgers. Stubbs never turned into an All-Star. combine Franklin Stubbs was a Rookie of the Year for the Dodgers; he never turned into the All-Star that many had hoped.
Ind Clause + dashes+ Ind Clause Combine two or more ideas that are closely related, but now you want to emphasize the importance of the second clause. I began exercising to get into shape next thing you know, I injure my back and am unable to move for a week !
Ind Clause + colon+ Ind Clause Connect two ideas that are really connected—and this time, the second clause answers something in the first. L. Frank Baum wrote The Wizard of Oz for his daughter : the book was much more than a child's story.
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Practice Complete pages
Adios Strunk and White Telescoping Techniques
Zooming The comma replacing the period, and it works like a telephoto, lens, signaling an upcoming zoom, a new clause generated by the material in the initial sentence. In this example, “Billy Faulkner chewed a red apple,” the comma allows the writer to zoom up closer on any of the items mentioned, and provide more details about, “Billy,” or about “chewed,” or about “apple.” Billy Faulkner chewed a red apple, the apple’s skin marked with dark imperfections.

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