PRIMARYSOURCESFINAL+working thesis.docx - HIS 121 Primary...

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HIS 121 Primary Sources and Working Thesis I. Primary Source Summary a. “David Walker’s Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World (1829)”: David Walker has traveled all around the US, and he has observed how enslaved African Americans are being treated with no respect and are inferior to the white man. He also describes the importance of African Americans on US history and mocks the elites who do not follow their own statements in the declaration of independence. i. David Walker does not support slavery. 1. “We hold these truths to be self-evident—that ALL MEN ARE CREATED EQUAL!! that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness!!” Compare your own language above, extracted from your Declaration of Independence, with your cruelties and murders inflicted by your cruel and unmerciful fathers and yourselves on our fathers and on us—men who have never given your fathers or you the least provocation!!!!!!” 1 b. “William Lloyd Garrison Introduces the Liberator (1831)”: William Lloyd Garrison preached the colonization of African Americans at one period; however, after being enlightened by David Walker and other anti-slavery important figures, he decided to change his opinion. He traveled from place to place, and saw how the south was more strict and dependent on slavery than the north. i. William Lloyd Garrison was against slavery. 1. “Assenting to the “self-evident truth” maintained in the American Declaration of Independence, “that all men are created equal, and endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, among which are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,” I shall strenuously contend for the immediate enfranchisement of our slave population. In Park-Street Church, on the Fourth of July 1829, in an address on slavery, I unreflectingly assented to the popular but pernicious doctrine of gradual abolition. I seize this opportunity to make a full and unequivocal recantation, and thus publicly to ask pardon of my God, of my country, and of my brethren the poor slaves, for having uttered a sentiment so full of timidity, injustice, and absurdity.” 2 c. “Prigg v. Pennsylvania (1842)”: Prigg vs. Pennsylvania was a court case, where Pennsylvania established laws that said that slave owners could not take their slaves out 1 "David Walker’s Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World ," The American Yawp Reader , accessed November 15, 2017. - of-the-world-1829/ . 2 “William Lloyd Garrison Introduces the Liberator,” The American Yawp Reader , accessed November 15, 2017.
of Pennsylvania, once they had gotten there. This state law contradicted the federal law which said, in the fugitive slave act that slaves must be delivered back to their master.

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