Domestic vs. Foreign.docx - San Luis 1 Dawn San Luis 19...

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San Luis 1Dawn San Luis19 December 2017AP US History3ADomestic vs Foreign AffairsBy the 1850s, slavery in the U.S. was firmly established with a series of statutes and penal codes enacted in various states to regulate the activity of slaves and all conduct involving slave and free state. Although some historians may argue that foreign affairs changed American politics during the 1850s, domestic affairs impacted more to shaping American political institution than foreign issues because these affairs seemed to address new political alignments toresolve the issue of slavery. The Gadsden Purchase did contribute to the accommodation of new states and westward expansion, however, the Compromise of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and John Brown’s Raid was an attempt settle the major debates on slavery in these states, slave state or free state.As the United States acquire over a half million square acres of land through the Mexican-American War (1846-1848) Congress is embroiled in the debate over how to divide the newly acquired territories into slave and free states. These additional territories include California and much of New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Colorado and Nevada. One of the domestic policy that is proposed to solve the problem is the Compromise of 1850, orchestrated by Henry Clay and Daniel Webster with southern Democrat, John C. Calhoun. They warned that the Unionwould only survive if the North and the South shared equal power within it. As a result, the Compromise passed a series of five bills. As part of the Compromise, California was annexed as a free state, which upset the balance of free and slave states. Additionally, the New Mexico and
San Luis 2Utah territories were given popular sovereignty, which allowed them to choose whether slavery would be allowed within their borders. The Compromise abolished the slave trade in Washington

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