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biol 301 hw2.docx - Hannah Reygaerts 11/04/2017 Lab section...

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Hannah Reygaerts11/04/2017Lab section 18Case Analysis: Meniere’s syndromeThe main topic of this essay is Meniere syndrome. Meniere syndrome is characterized by sensorneurinal hearing loss and is permanent. To understand how Meniere syndrome works, an overview is given of the structure of the ear, how sound waves travel from the environment to the brain, and a comparison of the types of hearing losses before getting into Meniere Syndrome.The ear is divided into three major parts: outer ear, middle ear, and inner ear. The outer ear exists of the auricle and external auditory canal. The middle ear entails the tymphanic membrane, auditory ossicles, and the Eustachian tube. The inner ear has the vestibule (utricle andsacule), semicircular canals, vestibulocochlear nerve, and the cochlea. (ASHA)The inner ear is responsible for hearing and balance as it contains the sensory organs suchas the cochlea and semicircular canals. Specifically, the cochlea is the hearing portion and the semicircular canals or a portion of the way we balance for example. The cochlea is recognized byits snail-like shape and bony structure. It is filled with two fluids called the endolymph and perilymph. The organ of corti, which is inside the cochlea, is the sensory receptor which holds the hair cells which in turn are the essential nerve receptors. Essential structures of balance would be the semicircular canals and the vestibule which consists of the utricle and sacule. Theselast ones share the temporal bone space with the cochlea and all share the same fluid. Both

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Term
Spring
Professor
De
Tags
Physiology, Anatomy, Conductive hearing loss

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