TLMN630 Geostationary+orbit+vs.+Geosynchronous+Orbit - Geostationary orbit vs Geosynchronous orbit Lets see the difference between geostationary

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Geostationary orbit vs. Geosynchronous orbit Let’s see the difference between geostationary orbit and geosynchronous orbit and found a website which has descent graphics to visually show the difference. Geostationary orbit - An orbit around the Earth at an approximate altitude of 35,800 km whereby a satellite travels in the same direction and completes the orbit in the same time as the Earth completes a revolution so the satellite maintains a fixed position relative to the surface of the Earth. The geostationary orbit has a zero inclination to the equatorial plane and remains over the Earth's equator. Most communication and weather satellites are geostationary because the satellite antennas that communicate with them do not have to move to track them. It's easier to transmit and receive radio signals from a satellite in a relatively fixed location than from satellites in geosynchronous orbit. Geosynchronous orbit - An orbit around the Earth whereby a satellite has an orbital period that matches the rotation rate of the Earth which is 23 hours 56 minutes and 4 seconds at an approximate altitude of 35,800 km. The difference is that the orbit can persist above the equatorial line or have an inclination to the equatorial plane. In the later case, the orbit still maintains the same orbital period as the revolution of the Earth, but spends equal time north and south of the equator tracing a figure eight relative to a point on the Earth's surface. References:

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