222.class10notesFALL18.docx - BLR 222 Class 10 Notes After the Union prevailed in the War Between the States the three post war Constitutional

222.class10notesFALL18.docx - BLR 222 Class 10 Notes After...

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BLR 222Class 10 NotesAfter the Union prevailed in the War Between the States, the three post war Constitutional amendments were passed and ratified by the States.13thAmendmentNeither slavery nor involuntary servitude, ***except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted shall exist within the United States***”14thAmendmentAll persons born or naturalized in the United States, ***are citizens of the United States and the State wherein they reside.No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws…15thAmendmentThe right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition ofservitude.Congress was specifically given power to enforce each of the above Amendments by appropriate legislation.The Thirteenth Amendmentby Gordon Leidnerof Great American History1
The 13th Amendment to the United States Constitution, passed by the Senate on April 8, 1864, by the House on January 31, 1865, and ratified on December 6, 1865, abolished slavery as a legal institution. The Constitution, although never mentioning slavery by name, refers to slaves as "such persons" in Article I, Section 9 and “a person held to service or labor” in Article IV, Section 2. The Thirteenth Amendment, in direct terminology, put an endto this. The amendment states: Section 1: "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. Section 2: Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation." BackgroundThe history behind this amendments adoption is an interesting one. Prior to the Civil War, in February 1861, Congress had passed a Thirteenth Amendment for an entirely different purpose--to guaranteethe legality and perpetuity of slavery in theslave states, rather than to endit. This amendment guaranteeing slavery was a result of the complicated sectional politics of the antebellum period, and a futile effort to preclude Civil War. Although the Thirteenth Amendment that guaranteed slavery was narrowly passed by both houses, the Civil War started before it could be sent to the states for ratification. But the final version of the Thirteenth Amendment--the one ending slavery--has an interesting story of its own. Passed during the Civil War years, when southern congressional representatives were not present for debate, one would think today that it must have easily passed both the House of Representatives and the Senate. Not true. As a matter of fact, although passed in April 1864 by the Senate, with a vote of 38 to 6, the required two-thirds majority was defeated in the House of Representatives by a vote of 93 to 65. Abolishing slavery was almost exclusively a Republican party effort--only four Democrats voted for it.

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