MOBILE PHONE.pdf - 531692 research-article2014 NMS0010.1177\/1461444814531692new media societyDavid et al Article Mobile phone distraction while studying

MOBILE PHONE.pdf - 531692 research-article2014...

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new media & society 2015, Vol. 17(10) 1661–1679 © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav DOI: 10.1177/1461444814531692 nms.sagepub.com Mobile phone distraction while studying Prabu David Washington State University, USA Jung-Hyun Kim Sogang University, Korea Jared S Brickman, Weina Ran and Christine M Curtis Washington State University, USA Abstract The mobile phone is a breakthrough advance for human communication. But with the plethora of choices available via smartphone, individuals who are deficient in self- regulation or with a propensity for addiction may face challenges in managing these choices strategically. To examine this potential dysfunctional aspect, we examined the effect of multitasking when studying or doing homework and found that both frequency and attention to texting and social media were positively related to mobile phone interference in life (MPIL). However, frequency of music use during study was not associated with MPIL, although allocated attention to music while studying was positively associated with MPIL. Ownership of a smartphone and the number of Facebook friends were positively associated with MPIL and women reported more MPIL than men. Keywords Attention, deficient self-regulation, media use, mobile phone, multitasking, smartphone, task switching Corresponding author: Jung-Hyun Kim, School of Communication, Sogang University, K328, 35 Baekbeom-ro (Sinsu-dong), Mapo- gu, Seoul 121-742, Korea. Email: [email protected] 531692 NMS 0 0 10.1177/1461444814531692new media & society David et al. research-article 2014 Article
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1662 new media & society 17(10) Introduction Multitasking is pervasive in everyday life and is spurred in part by mobile technologies such as smartphone that are widely used for work-related communication as well as interpersonal interactions. These days, mobile phone can be used to listen to music and play games, and users can download applications for activities such as online banking, booking airline tickets, shopping, making vacation plans, or tracking diet and physical activity. The versatility of mobile phone allows for seamless integration of work, play, and social interaction and enriches life in many ways. However, constant use of the mobile phone may also interfere with work. For example, an observational study of a small sample of information workers found that task switching occurred every 3 minutes and voluntary interruptions were as likely as external interruptions to cause switching (González and Mark, 2004). In another study that employed biometrics and embedded cameras during non-working time, task switching occurred 27 times per hour among digital natives and 17 times per hour among those who grew up with older technologies (Marci, 2012). Multitasking is also common among students (Carrier et al., 2009; Ophir et al., 2009; Pea et al., 2012; Rosen et al., 2013; Srivastava, 2013; Wang and Tchernev, 2012) and associated with lower academic or test performance (Junco, 2012; Junco and Cotten, 2012; Wood et al., 2012). However, the emphasis on academic performance as the key
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