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UPLOAD6 - Anthropology 101 TA: Mark Plane 4 November 2006...

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Anthropology 101 TA: Mark Plane 4 November 2006 Gender Roles/Relations at Fraternities Introduction: A common social scene for college students is fraternity events. Students all across the country attend fraternity functions and events on a regular basis. At these functions, a major part of the night is spent on interactions between the sexes. I am taking an interpretative approach to discover the significance of these gender interactions, and how outside factors play a role in the manner of their delivery. I will focus on interpreting the goals of each gender in this particular social scene and the apparent social structure (or “class”) within the fraternity. Topics and Approach: In taking an interpretive approach, I hope to “interpret the meaning” of the specific gender interactions at the fraternity and then “analyze [them] for meaning” (Ember 2005: 240). I am taking an in depth look at the questions, “What motivates females to attend these social functions?” and “What motivates the brothers of the fraternity to sometimes act presumptuously in front of their female and male guests?” All across America, college students pledge fraternities and sororities. From the Ivy League schools, to small colleges nearly unknown to anyone outside their communities; hundreds of males and females subject themselves to years of brotherhood
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to a fraternity of their choosing, each semester. Though the students at these colleges value different aspects of life, and have different priorities as far as education goes, they all made the same choice to pledge a fraternity. Most of these fraternities hold social functions on a consistent basis. Not only do the “brothers” of the fraternity attend, but also so do their “pledges,” unaffiliated “male guests,” and their “female guests.” My purpose is to try to interpret the appeal of these functions to each individual group, and how each group acts in different social situations. I will pay close attention to the female/male interactions in my observations.
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UPLOAD6 - Anthropology 101 TA: Mark Plane 4 November 2006...

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