Explication .docx - Lamb Peyton ENGL 203 Dr Cooper...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 4 pages.

Lamb, Peyton ENGL 203 Dr. Cooper 9/21/2018 Explication of “One Art” by Elizabeth Bishop Elizabeth Bishop uses relatable content in “One Art” in order to dramatize the issue of loss. The speaker of the poem is active in the poem due to poem being in first person, telling us stories of her continuously losing things such as, “I lost my mother’s watch” and “I lost two cities, lovely ones” (10,13). Within this poem, the audience isn’t clear, but the speaker speaks to someone directly in the last stanza when they state, “Even losing you” implying the audience is someone the speaker lost (16). The speaker notes that everyone loses different things throughout their life saying they “Lose something every day” (4). The speaker appears cultured and older due to having experienced multiple loses throughout her life stating their “next-to-last, of three loved houses went” which would mean she has grown old enough to see these homes leave (11). The speaker dramatizes the conflict of losing things such as material items or something more important such as memories and people. This poem consisted of 19 lines and six stanzas with the first five having three lines and the last stanza having four. The number of syllables in each line leads readers to believe that this poem is free verse instead of iambic pentameter, with each line having 10 or 11 syllables. We

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture