WA 2.rtf - Name ERNEST COLLIER IV College ID 0590356 E-mail...

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Name: ERNEST COLLIER IV College ID #: 0590356 E-mail: [email protected] College and semester: TESC, February 2017 Course code: Com-121 Course name: Intro to Mass Communications II Mentor: Casey Maugh Written Assignment 2 1. Describe the concerns about online information credibility, authority, and selectivity. Since the invention of the radio, our technological advances have brought us through many milestones. The most profound creation yet was the creation of the Internet. The Internet has provided an unprecedented amount of information for public assumption (Metzger and Flanagin 211). With a simple search in any search engine whether it be “Google” or “Bing” one can find answers to almost any question with the results coming from 1,000 or more sources (Dominick 99). Knowledge is power, and with so much information at everyone’s fingertips, the Internet is empowering to all its users. The biggest problem having so much information on the World Wide Web, is the fact, that not all information comes from credible sources. As stated in our text, “Information obtained on the Internet comes without a guarantee” (Dominick 99). When it comes to mass media it is usually normal to have a gatekeeper or someone whose primary function is to evaluate and censor the information that is being brought in (Dominick 99). However, this is where the Internet differs, because there is no one or any entity who has the responsibility of doing this. Any information that is flowing on the web, is doing so unchecked, and because the web is unchecked and so much information is flowing,
websites claiming they are credible sources must in fact be able to prove they are a reliable source. In a journal written by Metzger and Flanagin, it states ‘‘A major criterion for assigning credibility to a web site is whether the source is an official authority or not’’. The authority of a web site may be gauged by noting who authored the information, what the author’s credentials and qualifications are, and whether the site is recommended by a trusted other (Metzger and Flanagin 213). The way we evaluate online information is still not foolproof.

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