Theories of Psychotherapy U09A1.docx - THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK AND APPLICATION II Theoretical Framework and Application II Helena L Unhoch COUN 5239

Theories of Psychotherapy U09A1.docx - THEORETICAL...

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THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK AND APPLICATION II Theoretical Framework and Application II Helena L. Unhoch COUN 5239 Theories of Psychotherapy June 6, 2017 Professor J. Steinbeigle Unit 9: Integrative Approach 1
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THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK AND APPLICATION II Counselor’s must understand the dynamics of multiple theories and be able to integrate them into their sessions. Each approach has its own dynamic way of looking at the client’s situation and growth. No particular approach is universal and can address all the issues of human behavior, which is why utilizing different methods is beneficial within the counseling profession. This practice of using integrative methods allows the counselor to address the unique needs of the client. When determining which methods would be a best fit for addressing the needs of the client, the counselor must be able to understand all the contextual factors. These factors depend on the importance of personal and interpersonal components (Corey, 2017). Feminist theory is gender fair, flexible, and life span oriented. This theory emphasizes the role societal, political, and biological factors have on the growth and development of an individual. This type of therapy requires a strong therapeutic alliance; focusing on empowerment, valuing and affirmation of diversity, striving for change both personally and socially, equality, and the balancing of independence and interdependence. Feminist theory is often paired with family systems theory due to the overlap in ideas, as well as the differences that pair well with those expressed in feminist theory. This theory also emphasizes a strong therapeutic relationship and its importance in creating an open and honest environment. Family systems theory examines the interconnections amongst the members, and assesses their roles based on power, alignment, development, culture, and gender (Corey, 2017). The development of these two theories is fairly new, and is constantly changing and adapting. Because each theory has its own strengths and limitations, combining the two often lead to successful examination of the issues presented, while offering methods for change (Corey, 2017). 2
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THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK AND APPLICATION II Theoretical Analysis Theories Origin The development of theories is not linear, and their popularity is constantly shifting. Each theory undergoes its own form of development and is effected by the era it develops in. The development of feminist theory is brief, and no single person can be coined for its development. The major goal of developing this theory was to form a singular vision that would help better the mental health and treatment of women. The roots of feminist theory reach back to the 1800’s; first wave. This wave was small and didn’t accomplish as much as the second wave in the 1960’s. The second wave laid the foundation for the development of feminist theory by having women stand as one unit expressing their dissatisfaction with their roles. This lead to the formation of protest groups, which evolved into a “sisterhood.” This view for better women’s
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  • Fall '16
  • Psychotherapy, Feminist theory, Family systems theory

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