Course1.pdf - 530.329 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics Lab...

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Chapter 6 / Exercise 20
Electricity for Refrigeration, Heating, and Air Conditioning
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1530.329 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics Lab Fall 2018 Laboratory 1 - Flow Through a Venturi Problem set answers and extended outlines are due by noon (12pm)two weeks to the dayafter you have completed the lab. For example, if your scheduled lab session is on Monday, September 17th, your documents are due by noon on Monday, October 1st. Submit only hard copies of both documents. Include your name, the course number and name, and the lab number and name at the top of the first page of your problem set answers.Staple both hard copies together, with the lab report on top, before submitting them. Put your hard copies in the box on my door if I am not in my office. 0.Safety Concerns The wind tunnel can get very loud.All students must wear ear protection when it is running.1.Student objectives Use Bernoulli’s equation and pressure measurements of flow through a Venturi to determine the wind tunnel conditions for which flow separation occurs. Compare measured values of dynamic pressure obtained with a manometer to values obtained with a strain gauge pressure transducer. Gain experience interacting with a computational fluid dynamics simulation of flow through a Venturi. 2. Background In this laboratory you will study the flow of air through a Venturi section. A Venturi is basically a converging-diverging section (like an hourglass), typically placed between tube or duct sections with fixed cross-sectional area. Under certain conditions, the flow rate through a Venturi can be determined from measurements of dynamic pressure using Bernoulli's equation: 2222121122gzVpgzVp++=++(1) where pis the pressure, is the density,Vis the velocity, zis the elevation, and gis the gravitational acceleration, and the subscripts 1and 2denote two different locations along the same streamline. In this lab you will explore the use of Bernoulli's equation over a range of flow rates, paying particular attention to the validity of the assumptions behind the derivation of Bernoulli's equation. In particular, in deriving Bernoulli's equation the flow is assumed to be (1) steady, (2) incompressible, and (3) inviscid. Conditions (1) and (2) are fairly easy to guarantee in a Venturi, but (3) can be problematic. This is particularly true when the area ratio is large, i.e. when the narrowest part of the Venturi (the 'throat') is
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Electricity for Refrigeration, Heating, and Air Conditioning
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Chapter 6 / Exercise 20
Electricity for Refrigeration, Heating, and Air Conditioning
Smith
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