AFPRL 100 syl_Fall 2018.docx - Hunter College Department of Africana and Puerto Rican\/Latino Studies AFPRL 100\/01 Introduction to Black Politics Fall

AFPRL 100 syl_Fall 2018.docx - Hunter College Department of...

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Hunter College Department of Africana and Puerto Rican/Latino Studies AFPRL 100/01 Prof. C. Wambu Introduction to Black Politics Office: 1733AW Fall 2018 Office Hrs. T/TH: 4:30-5:20p T-TH 5:35-6:50p [email protected] Room: 214W Course Description : African-American experience in the western hemisphere spans from hundreds of years, starting from initial Atlantic Slave trade to the present. No single course can cover such an experience, the suffering and various inhuman ordeals that African-Americans have experienced. In the process of struggling to overcome suffering and gain complete citizenship, they were simultaneously able to construct their own rituals, traditions, spirituality, arts and folklore. In other words, the common human evolution took place among African Americans, just like any other community despite every effort to disrupt such a progress by those who dominated them. This introductory course in the African-American political experience will attempt to emphasis on ideas of black social thought, as they struggle to incorporate universal freedom for all Americans. During the course, we will study the meaning of wide spectrum of political themes, like freedom and universality of freedom; we will address the issues of democracy. Is America a democratic society? We will delve into the American constitution and the United Supreme court. Why did the constitution and the court fail African- Americans for so long? As we study, analyze and dissect African-American political struggles, let us be mindful of the famous warning by Dr. Martin Luther King, that human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable. He also warned us that every step towards the goal of justice requires sacrifice and suffering. That sum up the African-American political struggle. We will also delve into the complicity in American political philosophy, where ideas of democracy and equality are emphasized and yet fundamentally alien in application. Why does America seem to prefer unscientific and often false doctrines on freedom and democracy? Why for example did vulgar and exuberant theories of race superiority gain so much currency, even among the educated class? These and many other topics will help and guide us as we navigate through African-American politics struggles. Learning Outcomes Students will analyze and discuss the role that race, ethnicity, class, gender, language, sexual orientation, belief or other forms of social differentiation play in world cultures or societies (USA). Students will evaluate evidence and arguments critically and analytically. Analyze and discuss common institutions or patterns of life in contemporary U.S. society and how they influence or are influenced by race, class, gender, sexual orientation, belief or other forms of social differentiation.
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  • Allen,James
  • Political Philosophy, C. Smith, Hanes Walton/Robert C., C. Smith.

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