HST - Final Exam.docx - 1 Micah James 23 April 2017...

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1 Micah James 23 April 2017 Professor Daniel Clark Final Exam
2 In the first historical document given, flaws can be easily recognized in the first few sentences. The term “Americans” is used frequently, and it generalizes all Americans, regardless of race or social status, into one category. All Americans were not for racial equality, unfortunately. After the Civil War, for the most part, white Americans’ views towards colored people hadn’t changed ( Who Built America , 144). The Civil War ended with the Emancipation Proclamation, which freed all slaves, but their freedom was not true freedom. In the post-Civil War South, several segregation laws were implemented, motivated by the outcome of the Civil War, and these laws prevented African Americans from exercising the same rights as their white neighbors ( Who Built America , 144). With this in mind, the term “Americans” should be replaced with “individuals in favor of racial equality.” The former phrase doesn’t sound as appealing as the term “Americans;” however, it is far more accurate, historically. In the northern United States, racism was not as severe as it was in the South, but it remained a significant issue. The phrase “Progress was quick and effective in the North” is accurate, but fails to mention that racism was still an issue, which affected job opportunities, freedom of living where one pleases, and fair treatment ( Who Built America , 617, 636). An example of injustice events that occurred in the North is the case of an African-American family, a husband, wife, and young son. They moved into a house in a “white neighborhood” in Detroit, and were harassed so severely that they had to move out not too long after they moved in ( Michigan Chronicle, Family Bows To Raise Bias ). Examples of the harassment they endured include a mob of around 400 white people who crowded around their house and smashed their windows, partook in threatening phone calls, and poured salt on their lawn ( Michigan Chronicle, Family Bows To Raise Bias ). Another example of injustices experienced by African-Americans in the North is examined though an interview of Orville Hubbard, who was the mayor of
3 Dearborn for 36 years from 1942-1978. Hubbard stated “I’m for complete segregation, one million percent on all levels. I believe in economic equality (for Negros) but social equality is a horse of a different color.” Hubbard was rather adamant about his beliefs, and did not allow people of color to live in the city of Dearborn ( Michigan Chronicles, Why No Negroes Live In Dearborn ). Hubbard stated that the reason why “Negroes” didn’t live in Dearborn is because it was an “unwritten law.” Although Hubbard did not allow African-Americans to live in Dearborn, he allowed them to work there, as well as shop there ( Michigan Chronicle, Why No Negroes Live In Dearborn ).

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