15.4 South-African English.pdf - SOUTH AFRICAN ENGLISH IS...

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S OUTH A FRICAN E NGLISH IS LEKKER ! Source: S outh Africans speak English, but that doesn t mean you ll always understand us. Our robots are nothing like R2D2, just now doesn t mean immediately, and bab- belas is not a shampoo. South African English has a flavour all its own, borrowing freely from Afrikaans, which is similar to Dutch and Flemish, as well as from the country s many African languages. Some words come from colonial-era Malay and Portuguese immigrants. Note: In many words derived from Afrikaans, the letter g is pronounced in the same way as the ch in the Scottish loch or the German achtung a kind of growl at the back of the throat. In the pronunciation guides below, the spelling for this sound is given as gh . A abba: Carry a child secured to one’s back with a blanket. From the Khoi -San. ag: [agh] Generally used at the beginning of a sentence, to express resignation or irritation, as in: “Ag no man! What did you do that for?” amasi: [“um -ah- see”] A popular drink of thick sour milk. From isiZulu. An alternative name is maas. apartheid: [ap-art- hate] Literally “apart - ness” in Afrikaans, apartheid was the policy of racial separation, and the re- sulting oppression of the black majority, implemented by the National Party from 1948 to 1990. B babbelas: [bub-buh- luss] A hangover. bagel: [bay-gell] An overly groomed materialistic young man, and the male version of a kugel. bakgat: [buck- ghut] Well done, cool, awesome. bakkie: [buck-ee] A pick-up truck. bergie: [bear- ghee] From the Afrikaans berg, “mountain”, originally referring to vagrants who sheltered in the for- ests of Cape Town’s Table Mountain and now a word for anyone who is down and out. biltong: [bill-tong] This South African favourite is dried and salted meat, similar to beef jerky, although it can be made from ostrich, kudu or any other red meat. bioscope: A cinema or movie theatre, originally a defunct international English word that has survived longer in South Africa because of the influence of the Afrikaans, bioskoop. biscuit: In South Africa a cookie is known as a “biscuit”. The word is also a term of affection, as in, “Hey, you biscuit”. bliksem: To beat up, hit or punch; or a mischievous person. blooming: [blimmin] A variation on “very”, as in, “That new bakkie is blimmin big.” bobotie: [buh-boor- tee] A dish of Malay origin, made with minced meat and spices, and topped with an egg sauce. boerewors: [boor-uh- vors] Literally, “farmer’s sausage”. A savoury sausage developed by the Boers – today’s Afrikan- ers some 200 years ago, boerewors is South African food at its most traditional.

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