Chapter 4 Creating the Culture of British North America 1689.docx

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Chapter 4 Creating the Culture of British North America 1689 – 1754 Essential Question: How did events throughout the 1700s transition the North American colonies from separate entities into a colonial region with more common pursuits? This question is one you will be asked to answer at the end of this set of activities. Themes for Chapter 4 – Culture and Migration Introduction: Introductions provide a valuable guide to the material you are about to read, telling you what topics will be covered and how they fit together. If you keep the “big picture” provided by the introduction in mind as you read the chapter, you will find it easier to organize your notes, identify important information, and avoid getting lost in the details. With this in mind, re-read the introduction to Chapter 1. As you read, make a list of key topics you expect to learn about. Key Terms - Understanding the terminology of the course will be very important to your success. Begin every chapter by defining the set of terms that are listed, and you will discover reading is made much easier! 1. Sedition- The sedition act had prohibited anyone from making any disloyal remarks about the U.S. government. 2. Libel- defamation by written or printed words, [pictures, and or any form other than spoken words or gestures. 3. Seditious libel- The printation of lies with the intention of causing the downfall of the government. 4. “Middling sorts”- The middle class people of the Colonial America. England’s Glorious Revolution and “The Rights of Englishmen” 1689 The events of the Glorious Revolution were not confined to England, nor were its consequences. In the aftermath of the Revolution, many colonists had a new sense of their rights as Englishmen and of their relationship to the British government. Complete the table below and identify key aspects of British rule under these rulers, contrasting them in their views. James II William and Mary - Appointed a single governor over Plymouth, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Connecticut. - Centralized authority - Suspicion for the support of Catholicism - He was Catholic, even though he was the head of Protestant Church of England. - He tried to expand religious freedoms for the Catholics and tried to appoint some to high office. - Chosen as kings and queens by the parliament - Both protestant - The parliament was a deciding force in England, this was clear after 1689. - Two new monarchs had allowed the New England Colonies to be split up again - They had granted the liberty of Conscience to all of the Protestants in Massachusetts and Connecticut. - They were allowed to build their own churches and worship in them as they had wished. Reviewing the Facts Provide a short answer (4-6 complete sentences) for each question below. It’s OK if you need to go back and re-read parts of the section in order to find the answers. The purpose of these questions is not to test you, but to help you discover how much you know and what you might need to review.

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