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Addressing Raven’s Progressive Matrices 1 John Tan Professor Ashok Goel CS 7637: KBAI January 14, 2018 Assignment 1: Addressing Raven’s Progressive Matrices The Raven Progressive Matrices (RPM) is a pattern test that is use to measure one’s cognitive and reasoning ability to solve a problem that is purely through visual. It is usually consisting of a visual geometric design with a missing piece and the one that completes the problem or pattern by identifying the missing piece. I will start off explaining how semantic networks and generate and test works each individually. Then, I will show how solving the RPM with both semantic networks and generate and test together is the optimal solution. Semantic Networks Semantic networks are a problem-solving method to imply logic as a form of knowledge representation. It can be used to solve RPM by storing its own knowledge in the form of a graph that has nodes representing objects and arcs or edges representing relationship between those objects explicitly. The representation in these relationships brings nodes and links (edges or arcs) together and the link label stands for a specific relation. A specific way to solve RPM using semantic network, according to Winston, is through the “describe-and-match method” where one can identify objects (ex: dots, circles, triangles, squares, and other geometric objects) by describing it, then searching for a matching description in the library (Winston, 1992, Ch. 2, pg. 22). If there’s a satisfactory match of objects in the library, it will return true, otherwise returns false or announce failure. Then, it needs to identify the relationship between the objects after the objects have been identified, where the links indicate the object relations (i.e. inside, above, and left-of). There are also other links that indicates
Addressing Raven’s Progressive Matrices 2 object transformations (i.e. deletion, addition, expansion, rotation, reflection, unchanged) where objects are transformed between source and destination. The solution of the second 2 objects (from C to D) and its relationship is determined by the transformation of how the first 2 objects (from A to B) was predicted previously by describing its rules and relations (Winston, 1992, Ch. 2, pg. 25). With that being said, the correct answer for the example below is number 5, which is a square. From A to B, the outer circle remains unchanged and the inner circle gets deleted. Then when it transfers it to C to D, the square remains unchanged and the triangle gets deleted.

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