essay 3 eng 200.docx - Ben Crosslin Tuesday May 1st 2018...

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Ben Crosslin Tuesday, May 1 st 2018 ENG 200 Poetry Analysis 1 Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? 2 Thou art more lovely and more temperate: 3 Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, 4 And summer’s lease hath all too short a date: 5 Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, 6 And often is his gold complexion dimmed; 7 And every fair from fair sometime declines, 8 By chance or nature’s changing course untrimmed; 9 But thy eternal summer shall not fade 10 Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st; 11 Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade, 12 When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st: 13 So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, 14 So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. Poetry analysis The title of this poem is “Shall I Compare Thee To a Summer’s day,” and was written by William Shakespeare. This poem is his 18 th sonnet, which belonged to an extensive collection of 154 sonnets. This type of people is a lyric poem, or more specifically a Shakespearean poem. It has 14 lines written in Iambic pentameter, with rhyming couplets at the end that wraps the poem up. The rhyme scheme can be identified as ABAB CDCD EFEF GG. The poem opens with asking a question to his beloved, he asked her if he should “compare thee to a summer’s day” (1). The second line is the speaker actually making the comparison by stating his beloved as being “more lovely and more temperate” (2). Within the first two lines

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