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Running head: PERFORMANCE APPRAISALS 1 Performance Appraisals Christina Baker Indiana Wesleyan University October 22, 2018 I have read and understand the plagiarism policy as outlined in the syllabus and the sections in the IWU Catalog relating to the IWU Honesty/Cheating Policy. By affixing this statement to the title page of my paper, I certify that I have not cheated or plagiarized in the process of completing this assignment. If it is found that cheating and/or plagiarism did take place in the writing of this paper, I understand the possible consequences of the act/s, which could include expulsion from Indiana Wesleyan University.
PERFORMANCE APPRAISALS 2 Performance Appraisals Performance appraisals, in the form of merit ratings, date back to 1800 in Scotland. While appraisal methods have evolved over the past couple centuries, performance ratings are often very subjective [Mil17]. Ratings are based on performance metrics, which are measures of employee-produced results [New17]. Edward Deming, opposing appraisal system, believes that organizations often do not give their employees the tools they need to perform their jobs effectively [New17]. The balanced scorecard approach alleviates those worries. The balanced scorecard looks at the overall value that an employee contributes and not just the bottom line [New17]. Strategy 1: Improve Appraisal Formats Organizations can choose from three types of performance appraisal policies: ranking and rating systems, behavioral systems, and goal-oriented systems [New17]. The ranking and rating systems have three variations: straight ranking, alternation ranking, and paired-comparison ranking [New17]. The straight ranking procedure ranks employees compared to each other [New17]. In alternation ranking, raters are instructed to choose the worst employee and the best employee and then learn how to find middle ground in their rating processes [New17]. Paired comparison ranking rates each employee against all the other employees in the group, and the one that comes out on top with the most “wins” is ranked at the top of the group, and so forth. Unfortunately, this method becomes unmanageable when the group exceeds ten to fifteen individuals [New17]. Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scales (BARS) are the most common [New17]. BARS pair adjectives/descriptions of behaviors with the rating scale. Then, raters place the employee on the scale in the area which they see the employee fits [New17]. However, the organization must make the rating scale based on behaviors that in fact reflect the company’s objectives.

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