Behavior Management in the Classroom-5.docx - Managing the...

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Managing the Classroom Part A: Maintaining Appropriate Student Behavior As all the coursework leading up to this reading has suggested, good classroom management depends on careful planning of the classroom’s arrangement, rules and procedures, initial classroom activities, and instruction. However, being actively involved in student behavior throughout the school year is also critical to student success in the classroom. You should not assume that students will “know how” to behave in your classroom. Concomitantly, you should not be complacent regarding classroom behavioral expectations as the school year progresses and things are going well. Without your careful attention to “maintaining” appropriate classroom behavior day in and day out, even a class that begins the school year very well may become difficult to control. 1. Monitoring Student Behavior Therefore, monitoring student behavior s imperative, and two categories of behavior are especially important to remember: A. Student involvement in learning activities B. Student compliance with rules and procedures Whether you are conducting whole-group instruction, small-group instruction, cooperative learning activities, or individual student work, consistent and regular student reminders regarding rules and procedures and “proximity” management of student behavior are imperative. This means your should not be sitting at your desk, nor should you be tied down to one place in the classroom. Proximity management and movement around the classroom allows you to be available to students expeditiously and manage your classroom and classroom activities at the same time. 2. Be Consistent Being consistent with rules and procedures is equally important. Undesirable inconsistency usually arises from three sources: 1. Procedures and rules, as presented, are not reasonable or workable. 2. Teacher fails to monitor the classroom closely and detects only a fraction of the inappropriate behavior.
3. Teacher does not feel strongly enough about enforcing each and every procedure consistently. 3. Managing MINOR Inappropriate Student Behavior Promptly Inappropriate behavior must be managed PROMPTLY. These should behaviors should be managed directly without overreaction. A calm, reasoned tone is appropriate here, and a scaffolded approach to managing inappropriate behavior is recommended. A. Use a non-verbal cue, i.e., use eye contact, proximity management, a signal, to prompt the appropriate behavior. B. If this does not work, a simple reminder of the correct procedure may be effective enough. C. Continued off-task behavior requires specific redirection to the expected behavior/task. D. If this does not work, direct the student to stop the inappropriate behavior. Then monitor the student until the inappropriate behavior stops.

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