Why Teachers and Philosophers Need Each Other philosophy and educational research(1).pdf - Cambridge Journal of Education ISSN 0305-764X(Print

Why Teachers and Philosophers Need Each Other philosophy and educational research(1).pdf

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Full Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found atCambridge Journal of EducationISSN: 0305-764X (Print) 1469-3577 (Online) Journal homepage: Why Teachers and Philosophers Need Each Other:philosophy and educational researchMorwenna GriffithsTo cite this article:Morwenna Griffiths (1997) Why Teachers and Philosophers Need EachOther: philosophy and educational research, Cambridge Journal of Education, 27:2, 191-202, DOI:10.1080/0305764970270203To link to this article: Published online: 06 Jul 2006.Submit your article to this journal Article views: 361Citing articles: 7 View citing articles
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Cambridge Journal of Education, Vol. 27, No. 2, 1997191Why Teachers and PhilosophersNeed Each Other: philosophy andeducational researchMORWENNA GRIFFITHSSchool of Education, Nottingham Trent UniversityABSTRACTIn this paper I discuss the relationship ofphilosophersand philosophy to teachersand schools using my ESRC funded research into social justice as an example. Drawing on,extending, playing with and finally rejecting Schon's (1983) metaphor of the relationhip of thehard,high ground of theory to the swampy lowlands ofpractice,I discuss ways of keeping bothperspectives in touch with each other. There is a view of educational philosophy that its role isto produce maps for the benefit ofthosebelow. I argue that this is unhelpful both to teachers andtophilosophersand that philosophy as educationalresearchwill only flourish if a meansisfoundto keep communication open about both perspectives.INTRODUCTIONThis paper presents an argument about the relationship of philosophy to schoolsand school teaching and the way each could inform and change the other. Theargument is presented in a context in which formal philosophy is very oftenoverlooked as a potential contributor to the whole educational research enter-prise. Thus, this is a discussion of philosophy as a method in educationalresearch.In my view it is unhelpful to consider 'philosophy' or 'educational research'only in the abstract. So I anchor the general argument to the particular case ofmy research project into social justice in school (Griffiths, 1996a,b). Theargument is as follows. In section 2 I begin by stating my views about the natureof educational research. In section 3 I go on to consider one example fromeducational research. The particular question I look at is: how do the personal,individual, private aspects of a self interrelate with the political, collaborative,public struggle to establish social justice through education. I consider thisquestion, firstly, from starting places in formal philosophy and, secondly,starting from issues raised in the context of a school. In the following section amodel for creating a new juxtaposition of philosophy and education is suggested,together with an example of how the model might be applied in the case of the0305-764X/97/020191-12 © 1997 University of Cambridge Institute of Education
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192M. Griffiths
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