environmental science URBAN_HEAT_ISLAND.pdf - URBAN HEAT...

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URBAN HEAT ISLAND We are all familiar with the fact that cities are generally warmer than the surrounding, more rural areas. We see it referenced most nights in our television weather reports. It is especially significant on nights with clear skies and light winds which favor radiational cooling. This is most significant in the rural areas but in the city, the excess heat absorbed during the day and the local heat sources maintain higher nighttime readings. During the days or nights with strong winds and clouds the differences are minimized due to mixing and the advective cooling of the city by the winds. Because of this relative warmth, a city may be referred to as an urban heat island. The reason the city is warmer than the country comes down to a difference between the energy gains and losses of each region. There are a number of factors that contribute to the relative warmth of cities according to Ackerman: During the day in rural areas, the solar energy absorbed near the ground evaporates water from the vegetation and soil. Thus, while there is a net solar energy gain, this is compensated to some degree by evaporative cooling. In cities, where there is less vegetation, the buildings, streets and sidewalks absorb the majority of solar energy input. Because the city has less water, runoff is greater in the cities because the pavements are largely nonporous (except by the pot holes). Thus, evaporative cooling is less which contributes to the higher air temperatures. Waste heat from city buildings, cars and trains is another factor contributing to the warm cities. Heat generated by these objects eventually makes its way into the atmosphere. This heat contribution can be as much as one-third of that received from solar energy. The thermal properties of buildings add heat to the air by conduction. Tar, asphalt, brick and concrete are better conductors of heat than the vegetation of the rural area. The canyon structure that tall buildings create enhances the warming. During the day, solar energy is trapped by multiple reflections off the buildings while the infrared heat losses are reduced by absorption. The urban heat island effects can also be reduced by weather phenomona. The temperature difference between the city and surrounding areas is also a function of winds. Strong winds reduce the temperature contrast by mixing together the city and rural air. The urban heat island may also increase cloudiness and precipitation in the city, as a thermal circulation sets up between the city and surrounding region.
The urban heat island is clearly evident in numerous statistical studies of surface air temperatures over the years including Woolum, 1964 and in the depictions below from Critchfield 1983).

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