Case Study 6.1.docx - Running Header CASE STUDY 6.1 Prof Paul Jaikaran Network Defense and Countermeasures Abstract When Amazon.com changed its privacy

Case Study 6.1.docx - Running Header CASE STUDY 6.1 Prof...

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Running Header: CASE STUDY 6.1 Prof. Paul Jaikaran Network Defense and Countermeasures Abstract When Amazon.com changed its privacy policy, saying it may well reveal your book- buying habits (and other information), consumer advocacy groups howled. Amazon.com recoiled, defended itself, and then ... resumed business as usual. Perhaps the Web is killing our attention spans. Or perhaps, as privacy groups warn, we're letting down our guard. Amazon.com did not retract its policy, and that could set a gloomy precedent, some consumer advocates say. Even more foreboding, they add, is the relatively muted response by consumers and the government.
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CASE STUDY 6.1 Introduction On September 3, Amazon.com alerted its 20 million customers to a "clarification" of existing privacy policy. Primarily, the online bookseller says it may trade personal data about its customers with other companies without first checking with its patrons. In fact, Amazon.com claims it could have done so all along, although it never did market its customer data. Also, the company says it receives consumer profiles from other companies and merges the information with its own customer databases for marketing purposes. And Amazon.com's message acknowledges privacy-protection options for customers, such as cookie- blocking. Amazon.com also says it reserves the right to count customer information as an asset, particularly valuable if the company merges or is acquired. Privacy groups immediately protested that the update is actually a serious change in policy. Considering customer information, a corporate asset would let Amazon.com transfer private records to another company without customers' consent, critics say. Page | 1
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CASE STUDY 6.1 Overview For every new cloud service, an SLA assessment process should be done. The SLA is a living agreement though and as services change, the SLA should be reassessed. The SLA should act as a guide for handling potential problems. We need to look at the SLA as a tool for protecting the stability of the service, protecting the assets of the company and minimizing the expense should drastic actions be required. As an example, changing service
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  • Summer '17
  • ALBERT DOMINIC
  • Service system, Service level agreement, SLA

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