Columbian Exchange Article.docx - Part III Read The Columbian Exchange by Alfred W Crosby and complete the margin notes using the provided guide and

Columbian Exchange Article.docx - Part III Read The...

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Part III. Read “The Columbian Exchange”by Alfred W. Crosby and complete the margin notes using the provided guide and complete the activity that follows (you must have a printed copy of the article with the margin notes and activity that follows).The Columbian Exchange by Alfred W. CrosbyDetail from a 1682 map of North America, Novi Belgi Novaeque Angliae, by NicholasVisscher. (Gilder Lehrman Collection) Millions of years ago, continental drift carried the Old World and New Worlds apart, splitting North and South America from Eurasia and Africa. That separation lasted so long that it fostereddivergent evolution; for instance, the development of rattlesnakes on one side of the Atlantic and vipers on the other. After 1492, human voyagers in part reversed this tendency. Their artificial re-establishment of connections through the commingling of Old and New World plants, animals, and bacteria, commonly known as the Columbian Exchange, is one of the more spectacular and significant ecological events of the past millennium.When Europeans first touched the shores of the Americas, Old World crops such as wheat, barley, rice, and turnips had not traveled west across the Atlantic, and New World crops such as maize, white potatoes, sweet potatoes, and manioc had not traveled east to Europe. In the Americas, there were no horses, cattle, sheep, or goats, all animals of Old World origin. Except for the llama, alpaca, dog, a few fowl, and guinea pig, the New World had no equivalents to the domesticated animals associatedwith the Old World, nor did it have the pathogens associated with the Old World’s dense populations of humans and such associated creatures as chickens, cattle, black rats, and Aedes egyptimosquitoes. Among these germs were those that carried smallpox, measles, chickenpox, influenza, malaria, and yellow fever.The Columbian exchange of crops affected both the Old World and the New. Amerindian crops that have crossed oceans—for example, maize to China and the white potato to Ireland—have been stimulants to population growth in the Old World. The latter’s crops and livestock have had much the same effect in the Old World (OW)=Europe, Asia, and Africa New World (NW)= The AmericasDefine Colombian Exchange in your own words:The columbian exchanges is the widespread transfer of plants and animals from the new world to the old world.Cropsfrom OW:wheat, barley, rice, and turnipsfrom NW:maize, white potatoes, sweet potatoes, and maniocAnimalsfrom OW:horses, cattle, sheep, or goatsfrom NW:llama, alpaca, dog, a few fowl, and guinea pigGermsfrom OW:smallpox, measles, chickenpox, influenza, malaria, and yellow fever.What is the thesis of this paragraph? (¶) hint: it’s 1
Americas—for example, wheat in Kansas and the Pampa, and beef cattle in Texas and Brazil. The full story of the exchange is many volumes long, so for the sake of brevity and clarity let us focus on a specific region, the eastern third of the United States of America.

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