b030_caringforyourpatient_0.doc - Caring for your patient...

This preview shows page 1 - 5 out of 37 pages.

Caring for your patient with Parkinson’s Information for ward staff This booklet is for ward staff who need to understand the specific needs of people with Parkinson’s. You are likely to care for many patients with Parkinson’s and it’s important that their symptoms are managed appropriately – even if the reason for their admission is unrelated to their Parkinson’s. This booklet looks at the symptoms of Parkinson’s, the treatments for the condition and the potential side effects of these treatments. It also suggests actions that will help make sure that every patient with Parkinson’s receives the highest quality of care. Throughout the booklet we will refer you to a range of free information resources produced by Parkinson’s UK. Details of how to order these are on page 28. 1
Contents Key messages What is Parkinson’s? It’s a neurological condition It’s progressive It fluctuates Parkinsonism How should I approach caring for a person with Parkinson’s? Advanced Parkinson’s and end of life Multidisciplinary working Care planning for end of life How can I help people with Parkinson’s manage their symptoms? Stiff or rigid muscles Freezing Slow movements (bradykinesia) Tremor Bladder problems Constipation Eating, swallowing and saliva control Falls Pain Sleep problems and tiredness Communication problems Depression and anxiety Mild memory problems Parkinson’s dementia Dementia with Lewy bodies What are the main drug treatments for Parkinson’s? Levodopa Dopamine agonists Apomorphine Anticholinergics Glutamate antagonists COMT inhibitors MAO-B inhibitors Drugs to avoid Anti-sickness drugs Why is it important that people get their medication on time, every time? What other issues relate to Parkinson’s medication? When levodopa wears off 2
What are some of the potential side effects of Parkinson’s medication? Dyskinesia Neuroleptic malignant syndrome Dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome Dopamine dysregulation system Impulsive and compulsive behaviour Hallucinations and delusions What else do I need to think about when I have a patient with Parkinson’s? Surgery Going home How can Parkinson’s UK support ward staff? Glossary Key messages 3
Parkinson’s is a progressive neurological condition. The main symptoms are tremor, rigidity and slowness of movement, but the condition doesn’t only affect mobility. Remember that how the condition affects your patient can vary from hour to hour, or even minute to minute. 1 The amount of help and support you give them will need to vary, too. If your hospital has a self-administration of medication policy and your patient is physically and mentally well enough to do so, you should encourage them to be responsible for taking their own medication. If your hospital doesn’t have a self-administration of medication policy or your patient is too unwell to manage their own medication regimen, make sure you give them their Parkinson’s medication on time, every time. Taking medication at exactly the right time is crucial for people with Parkinson’s 2 and can make it easier for you to manage their care while in hospital.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture