GOV1280-GOVERNMENT & POLITICS OF CHINA- SYLLABUS FALL2018.pdf - HARVARD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT 1280 GOVERNMENT POLITICS OF

GOV1280-GOVERNMENT & POLITICS OF CHINA- SYLLABUS FALL2018.pdf

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Unformatted text preview: 9/5/18 HARVARD UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT 1280 GOVERNMENT & POLITICS OF CHINA FALL 2018 TIME: Mondays and Wednesdays 12:00-1:15 PM PLACE: Sever 203 Professor Yuhua Wang Office: CGIS K214 Phone: 617-496-2750 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: Mondays 2:00-3:30 PM or by appt. TFs: Shannon Parker ([email protected]), Office Hours: TBA Saul Wilson ([email protected]), Office Hours: TBA Course website: Canvas COURSE DESCRIPTION This course is a broad introduction to the main issues of contemporary Chinese politics and social change. Although there is a strong focus on the reform period (post-1978), we will also spend considerable time and energy on understanding the previous century of change and upheaval, including the decline of the last imperial dynasty, the rise of communism, and China under the rule of Mao Zedong (1949-1976). The course is divided into two sections: the first section covers the period from the end of the last imperial dynasty to the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976. The second section examines the last forty years of economic reform, looking at both how the reforms began and how they were sustained. We also investigate the many political and social consequences of reform and the changing landscape of Chinese politics. We will also spend some time discussing China’s economic and political relationships with the United States and the rest of the world. For undergraduate students, there will be two hours of lecture per week. There will be two exams: an in-class mid-term and a take-home final exam. There are five quizzes: one announced map quiz (provinces of China) and four unannounced reading quizzes (two in lecture and two in section). Quiz with the lowest grade will be dropped. The reading load is somewhat heavy but I have combined dense, informative interpretations of Chinese politics with more narrative accounts. This mixture should allow students the 1 9/5/18 chance not only to imagine how Chinese politics have been lived over the past century, but also to form their own interpretations. For graduate students, you are expected to attend the lectures each week and take the mid-term and final exam. In addition, each graduate student needs to finish a longer (2530 pages) research paper due at the end of the semester, and it will be graded by the instructor. Textbooks and Other Materials: Lieberthal, Kenneth. Governing China: From Revolution Through Reform, 2nd edition. New York: W.W. Norton, 2004. ISBN # 0393924920 Naughton, Barry. The Chinese Economy, 2nd edition. MIT Press, 2018. ISBN # 0262534797 Spence, Jonathan. The Search for Modern China, 2nd edition. New York: W.W. Norton, 1999. ISBN # 0393973514 In-class Videos: Some lectures will include segments from videos. Information from the videos is fair game for inclusion into exams. China in Revolution – covers from 1911 to 1976 To Live – fictional film spanning four decades Morning Sun – on Mao Zedong and the Cultural Revolution The Gate of Heavenly Peace – on the 1989 Student Pro-Democracy Movement China from the Inside – recent PBS documentary on contemporary China Requirements and Grading: For undergrads: • • • • Discussion Section participation Map quiz (9/19) and 4 reading quizzes (unannounced) In-class mid-term (10/15) Take-home final exam (due 12/17) 20% 20% 25% 35% For grads: • • • In-class mid-term (10/15) Take-home final exam (due 12/17) Research paper (25-30 pages, due 12/17) 20% 30% 50% 2 9/5/18 Attendance and Participation (20%) Lecture outlines and other materials will be posted on the canvas website. These are only outlines and do not substitute for attendance. Please come prepared to your discussion section. That means doing the reading and attending the lectures. The reading and lectures overlap but not entirely. Your participation grade will be determined by your engagement in class discussion. In the event of absence due to illness, please contact your TF to arrange for a make-up of a missed quiz or assignment. We will require a doctor’s note for an excused absence. If the instructor or TF is ill, we will notify you via email that lecture or section has been cancelled. Quizzes (20% combined) There are five quizzes in this class. The map quiz is in lecture (9/19). The other four are unannounced. We will drop your lowest quiz score. Your final quiz grade will be the average of your top four quiz scores. Reading quizzes may take place at the beginning of lecture or in discussion section. Midterm and Final (25% and 35%) The midterm is an in- class exam on October 15th. This exam will consist of multiple choice questions and short essays. The final is a take home final consisting of short essays. The mid-term will cover class lectures from #1-10. The final will cover lectures #11-25. It will be given out at the last day of lecture and will be due December 17, at 5 PM EST. Grade Scale: Final grades for the course will be determined as follows: A+ (100-97); A (96-94); A- (93-90); B+ (89-87); B (86-83); B- (82-80): C+ (79-77): C (76-73); C- (72-70). COURSE POLICIES Electronic Devices: I will post powerpoint slides on canvas before each lecture. Students are allowed to bring laptops to class in order to take notes and to give feedback or ask questions about the lecture during class. Students should exercise good judgment in class by closing distracting applications, websites, and phone apps. Grade Disputes: If you have any questions regarding your grade on an assignment, you must first contact your TF. You have one week to submit a formal grievance. However, you must wait a full 24 hours after receiving your grade to submit a grievance. If you remain dissatisfied after the TF reconsiders your grade, s/he will forward your grievance to the Professor for consideration. Please be advised that this can result in your grade being raised or lowered and the Professor’s decision is final. 3 9/5/18 Late Assignments: Late assignments will not be accepted without a doctor’s note or permission of the instructor. Academic Integrity Policy: Discussion and the exchange of ideas are essential to academic work. For assignments in this course, you are encouraged to consult with your classmates on the choice of paper topics and to share sources. You may find it useful to discuss your chosen topic with your peers, particularly if you are working on the same topic as a classmate. However, you should ensure that any written work you submit for evaluation is the result of your own research and writing and that it reflects your own approach to the topic. You must also adhere to standard citation practices in this discipline and properly cite any books, articles, websites, lectures, etc. that have helped you with your work. If you received any help with your writing (feedback on drafts, etc.), you must also acknowledge this assistance. 4 9/5/18 PART I: THE “PRE-HISTORY” OF REFORM CHINA Introduction Lecture 1: Wednesday, September 5 • • Evan Osnos, “Making China Great Again”, The New Yorker [ ] “Dean Yingyi Qian’s Opening Remarks to the Group of Thirty Meeting in Hangzhou, China.” April 2007. [Available on Canvas Course Site] The Decline of the Qing Dynasty: Internal Decay and External Threat Lecture 2: Monday, September 10 The Failure of Self-Strengthening and the Boxer Uprising • • Lieberthal, Governing China, Chapter 1, “The Legacies of Imperial China.” [Available on Canvas Course Site] Spence, The Search for Modern China, Chapter 10, “New Tensions in the Late Qing.” [Available on Canvas Course Site] Lecture 3: Wednesday, September 12 The Republican Revolution • • Spence, The Search for Modern China, “The Rule of Yuan Shikai,” pp. 277-283. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Keith Schoppa, “From Empire to People’s Republic,” Politics of China, chapter 2, pp. 41-71. [Available on Canvas Course Site] The Rise of Communism and the Fall of the KMT Lecture 4: Monday, September 17 The KMT, the CCP, and the War against Japan • • Lieberthal, Governing China, Chapter 2, “The Republic Era.” [Available on Canvas Course Site] Spence, The Search for Modern China, Chapters 15 and 16, “The Guomingdang in Power” and “Communist Survival,” pp. 342-409. [Available on Canvas Course Site] 5 9/5/18 Consolidation, Campaigns, New Modes of Control Lecture 5: • • Lieberthal, Governing China, Chapter 3, “The Maoist System.” Frederick Teiwes, Mao Zedong in Power, 1949-1976, Politics of China, chapter 3. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Lecture 6: • • • • Wednesday, September 19 (MAP QUIZ) Monday, September 24 Lu Dingyi, “The Hundred Flowers Campaign, May 1956,” In The Search for Modern China: A Documentary Collection, pp. 385-392. [Available on Canvas Course Site] “Professors Speak Out, June 10, 1957,” In The Search for Modern China: A Documentary Collection, pp. 392-395. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Deng Xiaoping, “The Anti-Rightist Campaign, September 23, 1957,” In The Search for Modern China: A Documentary Collection, pp. 396-399. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Jonathan Spence, The Search for Modern China, excerpt from Chapter 20, “Planning the New Society,” pp. 514-523. The Great Leap Forward Lecture 7: • • Wednesday, September 26 Spence, The Search for Modern China, Chapter 21, “Deepening the Revolution.” Jung Chang, Wild Swans, Chapter 12. [Available on Canvas Course Site] The Cultural Revolution Lecture 8: • • • • Monday, October 1 Spence, Chapter 22, “Cultural Revolution.” Mao Zedong, “Bombard the Headquarters!” In The Search for Modern China: A Documentary Collection, p. 426. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Macfarquhar and Schoenhals, Mao’s Last Revolution, Chapters 6 and 7, “The Red Guards” and “Red Terror.” [Available on Canvas Course Site] [Optional] B. Michael Frolic, “A Foot of Mud and a Pile of Shit” and “My Neighborhood,” in Mao’s People. This excerpt from Frolic may not seem to go with the urban-centered readings for this week. But we read it to get a sense of how rural residents responded (or didn’t respond) to political campaigns. [Available on Canvas Course Site] 6 9/5/18 End of the Mao Era Lecture 9: Wednesday, October 3 End of the Mao Era and the Rise of Deng • • Lieberthal, Governing China, Chapter 5, “The Reform Era,” pp. 123-148. Ezra Vogel, Deng Xiaoping, Chapters 12 and 13, “Launching the Deng Administration, 1979-1980” and “Deng’s Art of Governing.” [Available on Canvas Course Site] No class on October 8 Columbus Day Lecture 10: Wednesday, October 10 Film Screening: China in Revolution ********Monday, October 15: IN CLASS MID-TERM EXAM******** PART II: THE POLITICS OF REFORM Lecture 11: Wednesday, October 17 The First Phase of Economic Reforms • • • Naughton, The Chinese Economy, Chapter 5, “Market Transition,” pp. 95-111. Richard Baum, “The First Fang/Shou Cycle,” in Burying Mao, Chapter 3. (Chapter 1 optional) [Available on Canvas Course Site] Susan Shirk, How China Opened Its Door, Chapters 1-4, pp. 1-33. (Harding’s comments optional) [Available on Canvas Course Site] Lecture 12: Monday, October 22 The 1989 Student Movement • • “Testing the Limits, Documents from the Student Movement of 1989”, in Search for Modern China: A Documentary Collection, Chapter 26. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Spence, The Search for Modern China, Chapter 26, “Testing the Limits,” and beginning of Chapter 27 to page 714. 7 9/5/18 Lecture 13: Wednesday, October 24 Film Screening: Gate of Heavenly Peace Political System, Institutions, and Policy-Making Lecture 14: Monday, October 29 Communist Party Rule, Bureaucracy, and Policy Implementation • • • Susan Lawrence and Michael Martin, Understanding China’s Political System, Congressional Research Service, 2013. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Richard McGregor, The Party: The Secret World of China’s Communist Rulers, Chapter 1, “The Red Machine.” [Available on Canvas Course Site] [Optional] Lieberthal, Governing China, Chapters 6 & 7. Lecture 15: Wednesday, October 31 The Second Phase of Economic Reforms • • • Yingyi Qian, “How Reforms Worked in China,” in In Search of Prosperity: Analytic Narratives on Economic Growth. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Naughton, The Chinese Economy, Chapter 5, “Market Transition: Strategy and Process,” pp. 111-124. [Optional] Peter Hessler, “China’s Boomtowns,” National Geographic, Vol. 211, No. 6, June 2007, pp. 88-117. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Lecture 16: Monday, November 5 Rule of Law, Rule by Law • • Jacques DeLisle, China’s Legal System, Politics in China, chapter 7. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Donald Clarke, Peter Murrell, and Susan Whiting, “The Role of Law in China’s Economic Development,” in China’s Great Economic Transformation, Chapter 11, pp. 375-428. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Lecture 17: Wednesday, November 7 Political Reform and Corruption 8 9/5/18 • • Tianjian Shi, “Village Committee Elections in China: Institutionalist Tactics for Democracy,” in China’s Deep Reforms, Chapter 13, pp. 353-380. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Melanie Manion, Corruption by Design, Chapter 3, “An Explosion of Corruption in Mainland China.” [Available on Canvas Course Site] Lecture 18: Monday, November 12 Film Screening: China from the Inside Rapid Growth and Instability Lecture 19: Wednesday, November 14 The Economy • • Loren Brandt and Thomas G. Rawski, China’ Great Economic Transformation, Chapter 1, pp. 1-26. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Barry Naughton, “China’s Economy: Complacency, Crisis & the Challenge of Reform,” Dædalus 143 (2), pp. 14-25. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Lecture 20: Monday, November 19 Inequality and Social Conflict • • • Naughton, The Chinese Economy, Chapters 6 & 10 Mark Selden and Elizabeth Perry, “Introduction: Reform, conflict and resistance in contemporary China,” in Chinese Society: Change, Conflict and Resistance, Chapter 1. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Kevin O’Brien, “Rightful Resistance,” World Politics 49 (1): 31-55. [Available on Canvas Course Site] No class on November 21 Thanksgiving Recess Lecture 22: Monday, November 26 The Environment and Economic Development • • Elizabeth Economy, “A Great Leap Backward,” Foreign Affairs, September/October 2007. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Naughton, The Chinese Economy, Chapter 21, “Environmental Quality and the Sustainability of Growth.” 9 9/5/18 Lecture 23: Wednesday, November 28 Nationalism and the Media • • Zhao Suisheng, “A State-Led Nationalism,” Communist and Post-Communist Studies 31 (3): 287-302. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Ashley Esarey, “Control of the Chinese Media,” Freedom House Special Report. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Lecture 24: Monday, December 3 China, the United States, and the Global Economy • Graham Allison, “The Thucydides Trap: Are the US and China Headed for War?” The Atlantic Monthly, September 24, 2015. [ ] • Geo-economics with Chinese Characteristics: How China’s Economic Might is Reshaping World Politics, World Economic Forum Report, 2016. [Available on Canvas Course Site] Lecture 25: Wednesday, December 5 Review of Course Themes *******Final Exam (Due 12/17 at 5 PM EST)***** *******Graduate Student Final Paper (Due 12/17 at 5 PM EST)***** Exams and papers turned in late will be penalized 1/3 of a grade for every day that they are late 10 ...
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