geofenc.pdf - Geofence and Network Proximity Dmitry Namiot Manfred Sneps-Sneppe Lomonosov Moscow State University Faculty of Computational Math and

geofenc.pdf - Geofence and Network Proximity Dmitry Namiot...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 6 pages.

Geofence and Network Proximity Dmitry Namiot Lomonosov Moscow State University Faculty of Computational Math and Cybernetics Moscow, Russia e-mail: [email protected] Manfred Sneps-Sneppe Ventspils University College Ventspils International Radio Astronomy Centre Ventspils, Latvia e-mail: [email protected] Abstract — Many of modern location-based services are often based on an area or place as opposed to an accurate determination of the precise location. Geo-fencing approach is based on the observation that users move from one place to another and then stay at that place for a while. These places can be, for example, commercial properties, homes, office centers and so on. As per geo-fencing approach they could be described (defined) as some geographic areas bounded by polygons. It assumes users simply move from fence to fence and stay inside fences for a while. In this article we replace geo-based boundaries with network proximity rules. This new approach let us effectively deploy location based services indoor and provide a significant energy saving for mobile devices comparing with the traditional methods. Keywords- location;privacy;lbs; mobile; HTML5; geo coding; boundary geofence.. I. I NTRODUCTION Geo-fencing enables remote monitoring of geographic areas surrounded by a virtual fence (geo-fence), and automatic detections when tracked mobile objects enter or exit these areas [1]. A huge set of LBS (location based services) use geo-fence observation as a key feature. Location plays a basic role in context-aware applications. Geo-fences are user-defined areas defined around a Location. Locations here are cities, towns, other identifiable landmarks as well as vehicle parks of the user organization. Usually, the user is able to define the bounding of geo-fence area. For example, in simplest case it is just a radius defines some circular area. On practice, in the vehicle tracking system, a vehicle is determined to be at a particular Location if it is within this geo-fence (e.g., within the given radius for circular area). Any geo-fence implementation requires obviously some form of location monitoring. Technically, this monitoring could be performed either right on the mobile device or via some centralized scheme (e.g., telecom operator observes the location for own subscribers). The main sources for user’s raw coordinates on mobile phones as Global Positioning System (GPS) and Wireless Positioning System (WPS) using cell tower and Wi-Fi access points (AP) [2]. One of the biggest and well known problems with the location monitoring is energy consumption. It is, probably, the biggest limitation factor. Typical battery capacity of smart phones today is barely above 1000 mAh (e.g., the lithium-ion battery of HTC Dream smart phones has the capacity of 1150 mAh). GPS, the core enabler of LBS, is power-intensive, and its aggressive usage can cause complete drain of the battery within a few hours [3]. A typical GPS invocation consists of a locking period and a sensing/reporting period. The lengths of these two periods are about 4-5 seconds and 10-12 seconds, respectively. More
Image of page 1
Image of page 2

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 6 pages?

  • Fall '14
  • Astronomy, DNA, RNA, Work, Personal digital assistant, Wi-Fi, access points, signal strength, network proximity

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture