Binary Search Trees

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B INARY S EARCH T REES Contents z Introduction { Test Yourself #1 z Implementing Binary Search Trees { The lookup method { The insert method ± Test Yourself #2 { The delete method ± Test Yourself #3 z Summary Introduction An important special kind of binary tree is the binary search tree (BST) . In a BST, each node stores some information including a unique key value , and perhaps some associated data. A binary tree is a BST iff, for every node n in the tree: z All keys in n's left subtree are less than the key in n, and z all keys in n's right subtree are greater than the key in n. Note: if duplicate keys are allowed, then nodes with values that are equal to the key in node n can be either in n's left subtree or in its right subtree (but not both). In these notes, we will assume that duplicates are not allowed. Here are some BSTs in which each node just stores an integer key: These are not BSTs: Page 1 of 14 Binary Search Trees 2008/3/27 http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~cs367-1/topics/Binary-Search-Trees/
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In the left one 5 is not greater than 6. In the right one 6 is not greater than 7. Note that more than one BST can be used to store the same set of key values. For example, both of the following are BSTs that store the same set of integer keys: The reason binary-search trees are important is that the following operations can be implemented efficiently using a BST: z insert a key value z determine whether a key value is in the tree z remove a key value from the tree z print all of the key values in sorted order TEST YOURSELF #1 Question 1: Which of the following binary trees are BSTs? If a tree is not a BST, say why. Question 2: Using which kind of traversal (preorder, postorder, inorder, or level-order) visits the nodes of a BST in sorted order? solution Implementing BSTs To implement a binary search tree, we will use two classes: one for the individual tree nodes, and one for the BST itself. The following class definitions assume that the BST will store only key values, no associated data. A 10 cat 15 / \ / / \ / \ B C 5 bat rat 5 22 / / \ \ -3 ant 20 30 Page 2 of 14 Binary Search Trees 2008/3/27 http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~cs367-1/topics/Binary-Search-Trees/
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The type parameter K is the type of the key. Because most of the BST operations require comparing key values, we declare that K extends Comparable , meaning that type K must implement a method To implement a BST that stores some data with each key, we would use the following class definitions (changes are in red): class BinaryTreenode<K extends Comparable> { // *** fields *** private K key; private BinaryTreenode<K> left, right; // *** methods *** // constructor public BinaryTreenode(K k, BinaryTreenode<K> l, BinaryTreenode<K> r) { key = k; left = l; right = r; } // access to fields public K getKey() {return key;} public BinaryTreenode<K> getLeft() {return left;} public BinaryTreenode<K> getRight() {return right;} // change fields public void setKey(K k) {key = k;} public void setLeft(BinaryTreenode<K> l) {left = l;}
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This note was uploaded on 03/27/2008 for the course MATH 211 taught by Professor Onlineresources during the Spring '06 term at Wisconsin.

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Binary Search Trees - Binary Search Trees Page 1 of 14...

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