SNOBackgrounderNov15f.doc - SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY (SNO),thesizeofatenstorey building,',Ontario.SNOwas pl

SNOBackgrounderNov15f.doc - SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 4 pages.

SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY SNO INSTITUTE MEMBERS Queen’s University, Laurentian University, Carleton University, University of Guelph PARTICIPATING INSTITUTIONS University of British Columbia, Oxford University, University of Pennsylvania, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Louisiana State University, LIP, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of Washington, Brookhaven National Laboratory, TRIUMF, University of Texas, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY AND SNOLAB The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a unique neutrino telescope, the size of a ten-storey  building, two kilometers underground in Inco's Creighton Mine near Sudbury, Ontario. SNO was  planned, constructed and operated by a 130-member team of scientists from Canada, the United States  and the United Kingdom. Through its use of heavy water, the SNO detector provides new ways to detect  neutrinos from the sun and other astrophysical objects and measure their properties.  For many years, the number of solar neutrinos measured by other underground detectors has been found to be smaller than expected from theories of energy generation in the sun. This had led scientists to infer  that either the understanding of the Sun is incomplete, or that the neutrinos are changing from one type  to another in transit from the core of the Sun.  SNO scientists have used the capability of the SNO detector to measure all three types of neutrinos to determine that solar neutrinos are changing their type en-route  to Earth, thus providing answers to questions about neutrino properties and solar energy generation. The SNO detector consists of 1000 tonnes of ultra-pure heavy water enclosed in a 12-meter diameter  acrylic plastic vessel, which in turn is surrounded by ultra-pure ordinary water in a giant 22-meter  diameter by 34-meter high cavity. Outside the acrylic vessel is a 17-meter diameter geodesic sphere  containing 9,456 light sensors or photomultiplier tubes, which detect tiny flashes of light emitted as  neutrinos are stopped or scattered in the heavy water. The flashes are recorded and analyzed to extract  information about the neutrinos causing them. At a detection rate on the order of 10 per day, many days  of operation are required to provide sufficient data for a complete analysis. The laboratory includes 
Image of page 1
Image of page 2

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 4 pages?

  • Spring '14
  • DanielKevles
  • United States Department of Energy National Laboratories, Canadian Interuniversity Sport, Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, LAURENTIAN UNIVERSITY, Greater Sudbury, Nuclear research centers

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes