Respirationw7D3.pdf - The Mn2O7 a drop of dark green oil...

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The Mn2O7, a drop of dark green oil, forms in situ on the end of the glass rod. As soon as it comes into contact with the cotton wool, it aggressively oxidises the cotton wool causing it to ignite and burn rapidly.
What types of organisms undergo cellular respiration?
What is Cellular Respiration?
The energy that is released from chemical bonds during cellular respiration is stored in molecules of ATP.
What types of molecules are broken down?
The Cellular Respiration Equation C 6 H 12 O 6 + 6O 2 6CO 2 + 6H 2 O + energy (ATP) Glucose oxygen carbon dioxide water
Biochemical Pathway Cellular Respiration is a biochemical pathway just like photosynthesis in which each step (chemical reaction) of the process is dependent on the products of the previous step. The cellular respiration equation represents many steps that have taken place.
Label the Parts of the Mitochondria Many similarities exist between the chloroplast and the mitochondria Mitochondria has a double membrane Mitochondria have their own DNA and only come from preexisting mitochondria.
Mitochondria have a smooth outer membrane Mitochondria have a folded inner-membrane called the cristae . A folded inner membrane allows more surface area for chemical reactions to occur. Mitochondria have a center called the matrix .
Cellular Respiration in Detail
Glucose For the sake of simplicity glucose is used as the example for cellular respiration. Remember that many different types of organic molecules are broken down through cellular respiration.
Cellular Respiration Cellular respiration breaks down into these major steps. 1. Glycolysis (anaerobic) 2. Krebs Cycle (aerobic) 3. Electron Transport Chain (aerobic)
Energy Carriers Found in Cellular Respiration ATP NADH (similar to NADPH in photosynthesis) FADH 2
Oxidation Loss of electrons Reducing Agent (electron donor) Glucose Oxidized in steps using a coenzyme (NAD + ) and hydrogen atoms to strip the electrons from glucose & release E Reduction Gain of electrons Oxidizing Agent (electron acceptor) Oxygen: the final electron acceptor! Oxygen is strongly electronegative, as the e - leaves glucose, & goes to oxygen, free E is released becomes reduced becomes oxidized
Glucose is broken down in a series of steps to slowly harvest the free energy from “falling” electrons more efficiently The e - travel with a H + The H + ‘s ride along on NAD + NAD + - nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide is a coenzyme that transports electrons from glucose to the electron transport chain to make ATP NAD + is reduced to NADH + H +

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