The Wars essay (1)(1).docx - Ursula 1 ENG4U-01 16 August 2018 Symbolism in The Wars The novel The Wars[the title should be in italics per MLA format by

The Wars essay (1)(1).docx - Ursula 1 ENG4U-01 16 August...

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Ursula 1 ENG4U-01 16, August 2018 Symbolism in The Wars The novel, ‘‘The Wars’’ [the title should be in italics per MLA format] by Timothy Findley is not just a military story but about the struggles of forgiveness and being haunted by guilt and death. The reader gets a closer perspective on the life of Robert Ross a young man who enlisted in the Canadian army to escape his family and the burden of sister death. Through this journey, Robert character transforms, but his kindness never changed. This is noted in Robert affection compassion towards the animals. Even the characters in the novel have a deep respect for nature, despite the background being taken place during the war. Timothy Findley use of symbolism helps demonstrate the different sides of Robert Ross personality and create a deeper meaning in the novel. Findley uses various symbols assists the reader to reflect on Robert Ross connection with the natural world, his past, and struggles during the war. The protagonist ’s appreciation for nature is shown in his contact with animals. This relationship reveals to the reader that human instinct is not that different from an animal’s instinct. Animal’s instincts are what helped Robert stay alive during the war. There many times when Robert had an inkling something awful was about to happen because of animal’s reactions. After accidental taking his men into the fog, the air becomes "filled with the shock waves of
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Ursula 2 wings . . . and the sound of their motion sent a shiver down Robert's back" (Findley 76). When Levitt came back to tell them that they took the wrong turn and the dike was collapsing Robert “looked over his shoulders.'' and said '' Birds’’ (Findley 78). The birds were a symbol of danger and it’s evident when one bird flew by and the horse Robert was riding refused to go forward. Robert decided to descend from the horse and walk alone. Suddenly he walks into the sinking mud and is pulled underneath the ground (Findley 79-80). Later in the novel, Robert becomes more alert of the perils ahead “It was odd. Robert looked up. There should have been birds… Then he heard a rush of wings. Something exploded… Robert ducked as a whoosh of air threw him forward” (Findley 173). Just like humans the birds are trying to stay alive and are flying away when danger is near. In the novel, it’s apparent that Robert is more in touch with animalistic self than human. It is evident when one of the nights at the dugout when he couldn’t fall asleep he stated “sleep was dangerous. The animal memory in you knew that. No matter what your mind said, your body didn’t listen. Part of you stayed awake” (Findley 93). Robert is having a conversation with himself but using animal instincts to keep him alive. He also feels more connected to animals because he is comfortable with them. This is shown when he came across a coyote. He had no worries that animal will harm him, or that he will become lost in the woods. Instead, he follows it for almost half an hour because he wants to discover the coyote
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  • Spring '19
  • English, The Animals, Timothy Findley, life of Robert Ross

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