Chapter 6 - Processor internals and program execution _1ea281121996774ce76972085cb7537d.pdf

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 13 pages.

We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Linux+ and LPIC-1 Guide to Linux Certification
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 14 / Exercise 14-2
Linux+ and LPIC-1 Guide to Linux Certification
Eckert
Expert Verified
CSCE 312 Lab manual Project Description Instructor: Dr. Hank Walker TA: Suneil Mohan Prepared by Dr. Rabi N Mahapatra. Suneil Mohan & Amitava Biswas Spring 2011 Department of Computer Science & Engineering Texas A&M University
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Linux+ and LPIC-1 Guide to Linux Certification
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 14 / Exercise 14-2
Linux+ and LPIC-1 Guide to Linux Certification
Eckert
Expert Verified
Chapter 6: Processor internals and program execution In the lab-4 you learnt the basics of designing circuits that sit around a microprocessor. These peripheral circuits connect the processor to the rest of the system and thereby allow the processor to do something useful in conjunction with other sub-systems (like memory, IO, etc.). In this chapter you will learn what really happens inside a microprocessor, by actually designing a very simple processor yourself. In doing that you will also learn how programs actually execute inside processors. Processor internals are commonly termed as “computer architecture” where as “computer organization” deals with the sub-systems that are external to the processor. However these technology domains are very much interrelated, therefore to develop a comprehensive understanding in each of these, it is necessary to know both of these areas sufficiently. Basic processor operations : To understand how a processor works, we should observe Jack, who is a diligent and obedient worker (Fig. 1). Jack is provided with a list of tasks that he should do. Jack looks at each task in the list, does the work in a way exactly as mentioned in the list. After completion, he delivers the work, and then goes back to the list to check the next task that he has to do. Jack does this cycle till he completes all the tasks in the given list. Quite some time back, even before when geeks kept sideburns, (i.e. 1960s), processor designers had decided that processor circuits should work the same way as Jack. For example to execute the following “C” statement – a = b + c+ d ; the processor would execute the following operations in sequence, one operation at a time – Reads the list, understands what to do (“Fetch and decode”) Executes the task (“Execute”) Delivers the result (“Write”) Fig. 1: The story about Jack: the fetch-decode-execute-write cycle inside the processor
Opr. 1: Get the value from memory location that corresponds to “C” variable “b” Opr. 2: Get the value from memory location that corresponds to “c” Opr. 3: Add these two values Opr. 4: Store the intermediate result to the location corresponding to “a”. Opr. 5: Get the value from memory location that corresponds to “d” Opr. 6: Add the intermediate result at “a” with the value retrieved from “d” Opr. 7: Store the final result to memory location “a” For every “C” variable a certain memory location/address is reserved. Later you will learn who does this and how this is achieved. These operations (Opr. 1 to 7) belong to either one of the four standard class of operations: fetch (Opr. 1, 2), decode (not shown as a task), execute (Opr. 3) and write (Opr. 7). All computations inside a computer are performed using these four basic primitive class of operations. The fetch, execute and write operations are easy to understand. The

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture