lecture13 User Interface Design

lecture13 User Interface Design - User Interface Design The...

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User Interface Design
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The Importance of the User Interfaces The interface is in many ways the “packaging” for computer software If it is easy to learn, simple to use, straightforward, and forgiving, the user will be inclined to make good use of what is inside If it has none of these characteristics, problems will invariably arise If the interface design is very good, the user will fall into a natural rhythm of interaction. But if it is bad, the user will know it immediately and will not be pleased with the “unfriendly” mode of interaction
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Questions to be Answered during the  Design Who is the user? How does the user learn to interact with a new computer-based system? How does the user interpret information produced by the system? What will the user expect of the system?
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Consider Human Factors Although there is a definite trend toward graphical communication in human-computer interface (HCI) design, much visual information is still presented in textual form The text size, font type, text line length, capitalization, location, and color all affect the ease with which information extraction occurs As information is extracted from the interface, it must be stored for later recall and use In addition, the user may have to remember commands, operating sequences, alternatives, error situations, and other arcane data
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Human Memory All of the information is stored in human memory – an extremely complex system that is currently believed to be comprised of Short-Term Memory (STM) and Long-Term-Memory (LTM) Sensory input (visual, auditory, tactile) is placed in a “buffer” and then stored in STM where it can be reused immediately If the system engineer specifies a human-computer interface that makes undue demands on STM and/or LTM, the performance of the human element of the system will be degraded
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lecture13 User Interface Design - User Interface Design The...

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