amina wadud Female Leadership in Islam.pdf - 12/14/2017...

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12/14/2017Female Leadership in Islam 1/10Share Islamic Research Foundation International, Inc. Search WebArticles 1 - 1000|Articles 1001-2000|Articles 2001 - 3000|Articles 3001 - 4000|Articles 4001 - 5000|Articles 5001 - 6000|All Articles Family and Children|Hadith|Health|Hijab|Islam and Christianity|Islam and Medicine|Islamic Personalities| Other|Personal Growth|Prophet Muhammad (PBUH)|Qur'an|Ramadan|Science|Social Issues|Women in Islam| Article 433 Female Leadership in Islam BySarah Shehabuddin There is the woman My mother, sister, daughter She stirs in me the most sacred emotions How can the holy book regard her unworthy This most noble, beautiful creature Surely the learned have erred To read this in the Quran. -- Muhummad Ibn Tumart (1077-1130) As Ibn Tirmudh’s poem suggests, the debate over the status of women in Islam is neither a product of modernity nor the sole concern of outsiders to Islamic civilization. The past two decades have seen the appearance of Muslim scholars whose writings bear a keen resemblance to those of early Muslim modernists of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Their writings include new commentaries on Quranic verses, analyses of the authenticity of reports of the Prophet’s traditions, scientific proofs of the inaccuracy of certain extra-scriptural ideas in Muslim society, as well as clarifications of Islamic history. These works are often answers to traditionalist and fundamentalist views of women’s rights and roles. The past two decades have also seen three practicing Muslim women come to power: Benazir Bhutto of Pakistan and Khaleda Zia and Sheikh Hasina of Bangladesh. While they are certainly not among the first women to rule over Muslims, they have brought renewed relevance to the question of whether Muslim women may assume positions of leadership over men. This question is inextricable from the debates surrounding the status of women in Islam, gendered traditional duties of Muslim rulers and women, purdah, menstruation, motherhood, and common good. With Quranic verses, hadiths, historical and current examples of female leadership, scholars, such as Amina Wadud, Fatima Mernissi, Leila Ahmed, and Rafiq Zakaria, show that Islam does not ascribe leadership to men alone and cast doubt over the claims conservatives have made since shortly after Prophet Mohammed’s death. The Holy Quran : Concept of leadership with regard to gender Any discussion of an Islamic point-of-view on a matter begins with a study of relevant verses (if any) from the Quran. Most Muslims consider the Quran the unaltered word of God as revealed to Prophet Mohammed in the seventh century of the Common Era. It is the primary source of Islamic jurisprudence, followed by the Prophet’s example or sunnah (a combination of biographies and compilations of records of his sayings and actions), the consensus of scholars, and derivation of law through analogy. Unlike the last two sources of jurisprudence, Quranic ordinances are binding on all Muslims, as is the Prophet’s Sunnah. We will therefore confine our discussion of the scriptural treatment of female leadership to the Quran and Sunnah.
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