Ch18-20 - Ch 18 Ch 19 Ch 20(blood heart circulatory system...

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Ch. 18 , Ch. 19, Ch. 20 (blood, heart, circulatory system) 08/01/2008 08:53:00 Leviticus 7:11- For the life of the flesh is in the blood… If you stacked all the red blood cells from your body into a column, about how tall  would that column be? -31,000 miles One blood donation can save 3 lives. Key disorders: Think of blood as a liquid connective tissue: the fluid called  plasma , the rest  formed elements Plasma     - key proteins:  1)  Albumin-  made from the liver, transport 2)  Globulins-  immune system, they help mediate the protection, helps fight off 3)  Fibrinogen-  important in blood clotting, helps structure blood clots Other components include:  Nutrients (like vitamins, minerals, energy sources) Dissolved gases Waste products  Electrolytes( Na+) WDWC-  The concept of osmolarity  and the movement of substances in and out of the  blood -impact on blood pressure/edema -most originate in the liver
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-osmolarity is the measure of dissolved stuff in your body edema- accumulation of water in blood key term- hematocrit  osmolarity:   a measure of the amount of dissolved particles in a given volume of liquid.  (how concentrated a solution is) -water moves from regions of low osmolarity to high osmolarity. -potato chip example Formed Elements of the Blood 3 elements -red blood cells (erythrocyte (red))- most common form in blood 95% -platelets- fragment of a the cell -white blood cell- rarest Where RBCs come from: Erythropoiesis  Key players in the Life of a RBC: -kidney, liver- signaling centers via erythropoietin -bone marrow- birthplace (from stem cells)  -liver, spleen- graveyard, where cells are processed and disposed as waste -your diet- iron, B vitamins
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- molecule inside red blood cells- bind and carry oxygen but requires iron to do this  whole process Key disorders to know: Anemia- lower level of hemoglobin (red blood cells) emia (blood) an(without) Polycythemia- having too many red blood cells Sickle Cell- change in hemoglobin molecule so that the hemoglobin is abnormal,  transform the shape  of the cell due to the mutation (curved), plug capillaries; episodes  of pain in joints when moving, varies in degrees, traced by genetics Thalassemia- you don’t have enough hemoglobin to begin with, person fails to make  hemoglobins. Changes the amount  of hemoglobin  WDWC? Hemoglobin- the ability of blood to carry gases & blood types -impact on transfusions erythropoietin- hormone that stimulates erythropoiesis hypoxemia- inadequate oxygen transport sensed by liver and kidneys secretion of erythropoietin stimulation of red bone marrow accelerated erythropoiesis increased RBC count increased oxygen transport
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