Midterm1 Notes.docx - TOPIC 1 INTRODUCTION Lesson 2 Perspectives Health History Science and Society 100 people in the world 50\/50 male and female 17

Midterm1 Notes.docx - TOPIC 1 INTRODUCTION Lesson 2...

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TOPIC 1: INTRODUCTION Lesson 2: Perspectives – Health, History, Science and Society 100 people in the world – 50/50 male and female - 17 illiterate - 16 malnourished - 21 overweight - 7 have university education (vs. 1 or 2 10-20 years ago) Orthorexia Nervosa: obsession in eating only the “right” foods Plumpy Nut: a peanut-based, fat-based, protein-based food that has a long lifetime given out in countries where young children don’t have much to eat. Provided by UNESCO. - A ready tp use therapeutic foods (RUTF) - Ideal because the paste is not mixed with water You are what you eat, you are what your mother ate, you are not what you eat… Past 20 years: televisions getting thinner and people getting larger Iodized Salt: remedied to the problem of lack of iodide in the diet of some people rBGH: recombinant bovine growth hormone Functional Foods: no single correct definition exists, below are a few; Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare: Food that has physiological functions, including regulation of biorhythms, the nervous system, the immune system, and bodily defence beyond nutrient functions. Note Japan is the only country that has legally defined the term 'functional foods.' Health Canada: A functional food is similar in appearance to, or may be, a conventional food, is consumed as part of a usual diet, and is demonstrated to have physiological benefits and/or reduce the risk of chronic disease beyond basic nutritional functions. European Commission: A food that beneficially affects one or more target functions in the body beyond adequate nutritional effects in a way that is relevant to either an improved state of health and well-being and/or reduction of risk of disease. FF have been growing steadily for the past 20 years or so. Movements: Freeganism or anti-consumerism: getting food from dumpsters in back of restaurants or groceries.
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Rawsome food movement: raw and organic foods only Entomophagy: consuming insects Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier and his wife, painted by Jacques-Louis David. - Lavoisier determined how much CO 2 produced by eating - Conservation of mass 1920s plaster of Paris was added to four to make bread loaves heavier (this plaster is basically just calcium) Problems with food: how good it is, how it is presented, how nutritious it is, etc… INDIA vs. US – Consumption: Rice: - India 68.2 vs. 8.3 US Sweeteners: - 3x more in US Vegetables: - almost 2x more in US Meat: - India 4.4 vs. 120.2 US WATER: Apples are full of water. About 85% of the weight of an apple is water. Watermelon is 96% water. Radishes are touted as 98%. Apples: - Flavors - Sugars - Water - Fiber Many chemicals in apples (methanol, acetone, ethanol, etc). Every time we take a bite of food, we consume chemicals. Quantities are so small that they are not harmful. MACRONUTRIENTS (those that you can see) and the average caloric intake for each: (g/day based on a 60 kilo person) - Fat: 30% or 65g/day - Protein: 12% or 60g/day - Complex carbohydrates: 48% or 240g/day - Sugar: 10% or 50g/day Total: ~1 lb of dry food Proteins and carbs have about 4 cal/g
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Fats have 9 cal/g problem with fat MICRONUTRIENTS vitamins and minerals we will talk about.
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