pdf_us-history-sat-subject-tests-answer-explanations-revised.pdf - The SAT Subject Tests Answer Explanations TO PRACTICE QUESTIONS FROM THE SAT SUBJECT

Pdf_us-history-sat-subject-tests-answer-explanations-revised.pdf

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The SAT Subject Tests Answer Explanations TO PRACTICE QUESTIONS FROM THE SAT SUBJECT TESTS STUDENT GUIDE United States History Visit sat.org/stpractice to get more practice and study tips for the Subject Test in United States History.
2 SAT Subject Test in United States History SAT Subject Test in United States History This document gives detailed answer explanations to United States history practice questions from The SAT Subject Tests Student Guide . By reviewing these explanations, you’ll get to know the types of questions on the test and learn your strengths and weaknesses. Estimated difficulty level is based on a 1–5 scale, with 1 the easiest and 5 the most difficult. For more about the SAT Subject Tests, go to satsubjecttests.org . 1. Difficulty: 2 Choice (A) is correct. Between 1620 and 1700, immigrants to Britain’s North American colonies came overwhelmingly from England; it has been estimated that the ancestry of the British North American colonial population was 80 percent English and Welsh in 1700. Between 1700 and 1770, however, this changed as the population became far more diverse. In the 18th century, non-English peoples such as Africans, Germans, Scots, Scots-Irish, Irish, and Dutch came to the British North American colonies in large numbers, as a whole exceeding the number of English immigrants. In other words, immigrants to British North America in the 17th century were mostly English, whereas immigrants in the 18th century were mostly non-English. 2. Difficulty: 5 Choice (E) is correct. During the 1500s, the Spanish Crown established encomiendas for conquistadors and other colonists in North America. These included formal grants of land (B) from which grantees were able to demand goods from native peoples (C) and force them to work on farms or in mines (A). The economiendas also created opportunities to spread the Christian faith among native peoples (D). They invested power in individual landholders rather than joint-stock companies (E), which were more characteristic of English settlements in the 1600s. 3. Difficulty: 3 Choice (C) is correct. Although it is difficult to generalize about the framers of the Constitution, most of the leading framers did oppose political parties. In The Federalist papers, Alexander Hamilton and James Madison—two of the most significant framers of the Constitution— wrote strongly against “factions” or political parties and explained the ways in which the structure of the Constitution was designed to prevent factions from forming. In particular, Hamilton and Madison believed that both the scale of the country, and the system of checks and balances that they had built into the government, would mitigate factionalism. The framers did not

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