Ragtime Essay

Ragtime Essay - Emma Goldman, a feminist, is another...

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Audra Woods, 507 In reading E.L. Doctorow’s Ragtime , one is made knowledgeable of the era in which it was set. Although it is historical fiction, it in a variety of ways portrays the many different conditions of the time. Doctorow incorporates real-life characters into the book, and uses them to exemplify the political, social and economic pieces that make up the puzzle of the time period. Doctorow uses real-life Harry Houdini in Ragtime to give insight to his struggle within the growing social and economic time period. Houdini has a successful career as an escape artist, but is unhappy with it because the world around him is becoming more and more industrialized and moving forward in many ways that makes him feel insufficient and is being passed by. This is also seen in the beginning with the many immigrants whose capabilities restrict them in the work force and often are the reason for their poverty.
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Unformatted text preview: Emma Goldman, a feminist, is another real-life character that Doctorow uses to give us insight as to the political world of that time period. He leads directly into the heart of her work, incorporating the area of sexual politics into anarchism. In reading Ragtime , it is made possible to witness immigration and the life of immigrants through the Tateh, a Jewish immigrant from Latvia. Although this character is fictional, he represents what so many endured with his many hardships and challenges that were common to many immigrants of that time. Through these characters in the story, it is made possible to have a better understanding for the differences in society of that time period. And to recognize how far our nation has come within the different areas of politics, economics, and social aspects since that era....
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This note was uploaded on 03/27/2008 for the course HIST 106 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '08 term at Texas A&M.

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