Reading Notes .docx - Chapter 17 Freedoms boundaries at home and abroad(1890-1990 In 1892 Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick his local supervisor decided to

Reading Notes .docx - Chapter 17 Freedoms boundaries at...

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Chapter 17 - Freedom’s boundaries, at home and abroad (1890-1990) - In 1892, Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick, his local supervisor, decided to operate the plant on a nonunion basis - The populist challenge - The farmer’s revolt - The interruption of cotton exports during the Civil War had led to the rapid expansion of production in India, Egypt, and Brazil. - Farmers’ Alliance - proposed that the federal government establish warehouses where farmers could store their crops until they were sold - The people’s party - Populists - Attempting to speak for the producing classes - Farmers, miners, industrial workers. - The populist platform - “brought to the verge of moral, political, and material ruin” - Called for public ownership of the railroads - The populist coalition - Black and white unity - Mary Elizabeth Lease - The government and labor - Coxey’s army - several hundred unemployed men who marched to washington demanding economic relief - Populism and Labor - Urban working-class voters instead shifted en masse to the Republicans, who claimed that raising tariff rates would restore prosperity by protecting manufacturers and industrial workers from the competition of imported goods and cheap foreign labor. - Bryan and Free Silver - The campaign of 1896 - The segregated south - The redeemers in power - coalition of merchants, planters, and business entrepreneurs who dominated the region’s politics after 1877 - The south’s prison population rose, and the renting out of convicts became a profitable business - The failure of the New South Dream - New South, an era of prosperity based on industrial expansion and agricultural diversification - southern cities were mainly export centers for cotton, tobacco, and rice, with little industry or skilled labor - Black life in the south - They supported the growth of a black middle class, mostly professionals like teachers and physicians, or businessmen like undertakers and shopkeepers serving the needs of black customers - More black women than white women worked for wages - The kansas Exodus
- The decline of black politics - With black men of talent and ambition turning away from politics, the banner of political leadership passed to black women activists - National Association of Colored Women, founded in 1896 - The elimination of Black Voting - Poll tax, literacy tests, understanding of the state constitution - Grandfather clause - exempting from the new requirements descendants of persons eligible to vote before the civil war - The law of segregation - Civil Rights Act of 1875, which had outlawed racial discrimination by hotels, theaters, railroads, and other public facilities. - Plessy V Ferguson - separate facilities for blacks and whites - “Separate but equal” - The rise of lynching - In every year between 1883 and 1905, more than fifty persons, the vast majority of them black men, were lynched in the South—that is, murdered by a mob - Politics, religion, and memory - the Lost Cause, a romanticized version of slavery, the Old South, and the Confederate experience - Redrawing the boundaries - The new immigration and the new nativism -

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