Types of Business Presentations (For Extra Reading if you are interested).pdf - Confirming Pages Informative Presentations Briefings Reports Training

Types of Business Presentations (For Extra Reading if you are interested).pdf

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 44 pages.

400 After reading this chapter, you should be able to 1. Prepare and deliver the following types of informative presentations: briefing, feasibil- ity report, status report, final report, train- ing session. 2. Choose the most persuasive organization plan for your topic, audience, and situation. 3. Understand the elements of and be able to construct motivational speeches, goodwill speeches, proposals, and sales presentations. 4. Design a persuasive appeal that is ethical and effective. 5. Distinguish persuasive strategies (problem– solution, comparative advantage, criteria satisfaction, and motivated sequence) and use each in appropriate presentations. 6. Work with others to plan and deliver a group presentation. 7. Prepare and deliver remarks for these spe- cial occasions: welcoming remarks, intro- ducing another speaker, honoring a person or institution, giving a toast, and presenting and accepting an award. chapter objectives Informative Presentations Briefings Reports Training Persuasive Presentations Organizing Persuasive Messages Types of Persuasive Presentations Strategies for Ethical Persuasion Group Presentations Approaches to Organizing a Group Presentation Planning Introductions, Conclusions, and Transitions in Group Presentations Delivering a Group Presentation Special-Occasion Speaking Welcoming a Guest or Group Introducing Another Speaker Honoring a Person or an Institution Giving a Toast Presenting an Award Accepting an Award Review Points Key Terms Activities Resources chapter outline Types of Business Presentations 13
Image of page 1
401 A fter reading this far, you know how to deliver an effective presentation. The information in Chapters 10 through 12 will serve you well, but specific situations call for specific approaches. This chapter offers guidelines for delivering a variety of presentations: informative talks (briefings, reports, training), persuasive talks in various forms, group presentations, and remarks you will make on special occasions (welcoming remarks, introductions, giving and accepting awards, honoring special guests, and celebratory toasts). This chapter builds on the skills you have already learned, helping you gain the extra margin of effectiveness that can make your presentations interesting and effective—even outstanding. Informative Presentations Briefings, reports, training, and explanations are certainly informative, but there is also a persuasive element to most, if not all, good informative talks. Unless your audience is already motivated to hear what you have to say—whether management will be giving end-of-year bonuses in December, for example—you’ll need to convince them that your remarks are worth listening to. Furthermore, you will almost always be trying to create a good impression about yourself—a persuasive goal. Despite the overlap between informa- tive and persuasive speaking, it’s worthwhile to focus on how to proceed when your primary goal is “teaching,” not “preaching.”
Image of page 2
402 Part Five Making Effective Presentations Briefings Briefings
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 44 pages?

  • Fall '18
  • Beard
  • Business, Interest, Audience theory

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture