ADHD paper - Overmedicating children 1 Let's rethink the...

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Overmedicating children 1 Let’s rethink the use of Psychotropic medication in children Krystal Fillingame University of Wisconsin – Madison Life Science Communication November 28, 2007
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Overmedicating children 2 Let’s rethink the use of psychotropic medication in children Imagine you are sitting in a classroom, as many students are forced to do. The teacher keeps going on and on. The information is simple, boring: 1+1=2, 1+2=3, and so on. You began to fade off; you aren’t hearing anything the teacher is saying. She is becoming mumbled. To your right is a huge window, you look outside and notice that it is bright and sunny. All you can think about is going outside to play, and then you hear your name. “Sam……Sam, what is the answer?” the teacher asks. This brings you back to the classroom. You have no idea what she even asked. “Why do you always ask me? Jerry knows this stuff too.” You begin to get disruptive in class, kicking the desk in front of you. You then throw the other student’s papers on the ground. You think this is funny. This is what many children go through every day at school. The first thing that comes to the teacher’s mind is that you have ADHD. She mentions something to your parents and your parents call your pediatrician. A week later you are put on a daily dose of a psychotropic medication for ADHD, Adderall. Many children face this diagnosis every day and are put on medication to control it, when in fact they don’t need to be. A few things that are contributing to the increase in ADHD diagnosis include: physicians are misdiagnosing children with ADHD, parents aren’t spending time with their children, and schools are influencing the increase in stimulant prescriptions. I feel overmedicating children with ADHD medication is harmful because it poses great health risks and anytime you can treat something without using medication that route should be explored. There are many other alternatives to treating ADHD children than using medications.
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Overmedicating children 3 ADHD, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, is a mental disorder that causes a person to be inattentive. It is a behavioral and thought pattern that evokes a person to have difficulty focusing and controlling their own behavior. Livingstone explains that it is an imbalance of catecholamines, which are chemicals called neurotransmitters in the brain, that transmit messages among the nerve cells, which cause this disorder (1997). People who have this disorder exhibit various symptoms. The symptoms are divided into 3 categories: inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsiveness. The child can exhibit all of these symptoms or only some of them. Inattention is when a person can not pay attention or focus; they are easily distracted, and often unorganized. When a person shows hyperactivity they cannot sit still, they talk too much, they are loud and fidgety. A person shows impulsivity when they speak without thinking, interrupt others often, cannot share,
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This note was uploaded on 03/27/2008 for the course LS COM 100 taught by Professor Cachatorie during the Fall '07 term at Wisconsin.

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ADHD paper - Overmedicating children 1 Let's rethink the...

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