HPV paper - All about HPV 1 All about Human Papillomavirus...

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All about HPV 1 All about Human Papillomavirus Krystal Fillingame University of Wisconsin – Madison October 15, 2007
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All about HPV 2 All about Human Papillomavirus Did you know that half of the population who has had sex will have HPV during their lifetime (FDA, 2006)? According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) (2006), there are 20 million people in the United States who are infected at any given time; as well as, 6.2 million new cases each year. The CDC (2004) also claims that by 50 years of age about 80% of all women will be infected with HPV. HPV is a virus that infects the skin and mucus linings of the body. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) goes further to separate HPV into two different categories, “high risk” and “low risk” HPV infections. The fact is that everyone is susceptible to this virus; anyone can acquire the virus and anyone can transmit the virus. The main reason for such a high rate of incidence is due to its absence of signs and symptoms; as a matter of fact, the majority of people who become infected never know they are infected (Torpy, 2007). Becoming infected with HPV puts women at risk for cervical cancer. There are varies ways to diagnose it, most commonly the pap screening (CDC, 2004). HPV is not curable, only preventable. Gardasil is a new vaccine that was recently developed to prevent HPV infections. Since this virus is not curable, the only thing that can be treated is the HPV related diseases such as, genital warts and cervical cancer. This is why it is so important for the public to know about the existence of the virus and how to prevent the spread of it. Many wonder, “ What is HPV?” HPV is also known as Human papillomavirus. It is a virus that infects the skin and mucus linings of the body (Wyand & Arrindell, 2005). There are over 100 different strains of this virus, many of which cause the common warts on people’s hands and feet. According to the CDC (2006), there are 30 different HPVs that are passed
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All about HPV 3 through sexual contact. The NCI (2006) explains the difference between “low risk” HPVs and “high risk” HPVs. The most common “low risk” HPVs are HPV 6 and HPV 11. These two strains of the virus are associated with genital and respiratory warts and usually aren’t associated with cancer. On the other hand, the most common “high risk” HPVs are HPV 16 and HPV 18. While most of the other “high risk” viruses go away on their own, these two are linked to causing cancer. According to Wyand & et. al. (2005), these viruses that are linked to causing cancer begin to grow, and are usually flat and invisible. They start as abnormal cells which become precancerous and eventually lead to cancer cells if not treated. The majority of cervical cancer is seen in undeveloped nations, such as Africa, due to the lack in their screening programs. This leads us to the question of, “Who can get HPV?” The fact is that everyone is susceptible to acquiring this virus. The Food and Drug
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HPV paper - All about HPV 1 All about Human Papillomavirus...

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