CJD: Understanding Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease | CE Article | NursingCenter.pdf

CJD: Understanding Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease | CE Article | NursingCenter.pdf

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11/30/18, 9)02 PM CJD: Understanding Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease | CE Article | NursingCenter Page 1 of 8 Home / Journal Index / Nursing2018 / CJD: Understanding Creutzfe... CJD: Understanding Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease Authors Vacca, Vincent M. Jr. MSN, RN, CCRN, SCRN Article Content RARE, TRANSMISSIBLE, and rapidly progressive, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is an ultimately fatal central nervous system infection caused by accumulation of abnormally shaped prion proteins in neurons (see Understanding prion proteins ).1 Although categorized as an infection, CJD doesn't lead to the immune system or inflammatory response typical of most infectious diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology and diagnosis of this terminal illness and nursing care for patients with suspected or confirmed CJD. Figure. No caption available. Spongiform degeneration CJD is an invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease without known treatment. It belongs to a group of transmissible brain disorders resulting from a structural abnormality of normal cellular proteins called prion proteins (PrP). These abnormal prion proteins (PrP ) are resistant to degradation and become widespread through the brain. They form a toxic aggregate causing spongiform degeneration of brain tissue, loss of neurons, and gliosis or scar formation in brain tissue. Spongiform refers to the sponge-like appearance of infected brain tissue when viewed under a microscope.1-4 Source: Nursing2018 March 2016, Volume 46 Number 3 , p 36 - 42 Earn 2 Contact Hours This article has an associated Continuing Education component. Cost for CE: $21.95. Expires March 01, 2019. Go to CE Details SC Search . . . Lippincott NursingCenter ® Sign in Journals & Articles Continuing Education Clinical Resources Career Resources Blog Nursing Students
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11/30/18, 9)02 PM CJD: Understanding Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease | CE Article | NursingCenter Page 2 of 8 CJD is the most common of the known human prion diseases, also called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.3 Prion diseases found in animals include bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also called "mad cow disease," scrapie in sheep, feline encephalopathy, and chronic wasting disease found in mink and elk.5 The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), a division of the National Institutes of Health, recognizes three major categories of CJD:3 * Sporadic CJD (sCJD), which occurs spontaneously in people with no known risk factors for the disease. The most common type, sCJD accounts for at least 85% of all cases in the United States and worldwide and affects males and females equally. It's characterized by rapidly progressive clinical deterioration leading to death within months.1,6 * Familial or hereditary CJD (hCJD). Patients with this type have a family history of CJD or test positive for a genetic mutation associated with CJD. From 5% to 10% of CJD cases are diagnosed hCJD in the United States.3 * Acquired (iatrogenic) CJD (aCJD). Transmitted by exposure to infectious brain or nervous system
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  • Fall '18
  • Jessica Smith
  • Bovine spongiform encephalopathy, Prion, CJD

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