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00:00 ______________________________________________________________________________ This video is a re-creation of an actual course of therapy. Several details have been changed to preserve confidentiality. This program is intended for use by mental health professionals. It is not a substitute for supervised training. NEWBRIDGE PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS Presents Assessment & Treatment of Psychological Disorders A VIDEO SERIES MIXED ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach with DONALD MEICHENBAUM, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario, Canada Donald Meichenbaum Hi, I'm Don Meichenbaum. For the last 30 years I've been involved in the development and evaluation of cognitive-behavior therapy procedures with a variety of psychiatric patients. In recent years, cognitive-behavior therapy has been receiving increasing attention because of its demonstrated effectiveness. Cognitive-behavior therapy helps clients to become aware of the interdependence between their, their feelings, their thoughts, behavior and resulting consequences. I've come to appreciate that psychotherapy in general and cognitive behavior procedures in particular address a number of specific psychotherapeutic task. The first task of psychotherapy is to help the client tell her story. The therapist operates in a nonjudgmental, empathic fashion in order to find out what brings the client to therapy and what is its impact. There's also a need for the therapist to help the client tell the whole story, the rest of the story, ah, the strengths and resilience, the courage and coping skills that they've demonstrated. The second task of psychotherapy is to educate the client about the nature of her presenting problems. This educational process is no didactic exercise. It's a Socratic process, an ongoing discovery process between the therapist and the client. The next task is to help the client reconceptualize her problems in more hopeful terms; to shift from a description of her situation as a global predicament into a problem that lends itself to solutions. It is also important that clients have the intra and interpersonal skills in order to cope more effectively in their daily lives. Moreover, it's important for clients to perform personal experiments, in vivo, so that they can take the data that results from these personal experiments as evidence to unfreeze their beliefs about themselves and the world. It's also important that clients take credit, take ownership, for the changes that they've brought about, to see the connections between their own actions and these resulting consequences. The final task of psychotherapy is relapse prevention. It is critical for the therapist and client to work together in anticipating possible lapses and setbacks so that the client does not take these lapses and setbacks as occasions to catastrophize and relapse. In this program with a client who has both panic and depressive symptoms, we will see how these various task are addressed.

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